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  5. "Ho lo sciampo in bagno."

"Ho lo sciampo in bagno."

Translation:I have the shampoo in the bathroom.

March 22, 2013

76 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mlight

another example of only using "in" when it translates to in the


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blomeley

You could find a long list of nouns where you only use 'in' instead of 'nel' or 'al' etc if you searched for one. You then just have to memorise them. Alternatively, you will always be understood if you don't get it right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gringorjones

I think ive read another comment somewhere saying that rooms in the house use 'in'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

Yeah I think this is a general rule


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Moir1

"in" general.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel284698

Agree, it's incorrect, should've been "in bathroom"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blomeley

In Italy most of the shampoo was labelled in "shampoo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaspberryBlue_It

It is shampoo. Nobody writes sciampo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunalooch

"I have the shampoo in bathroom". Why is it wrong? bagno is without definate article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sassicat

In English you would always say "in the bathroom"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunalooch

Thanks, I am non-native speaker and I am often not sure about English and whether it is a problem with my English or with duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderT51

Agree, this is not an English learning class, but Italian. So even if 'in bathroom' doesn't sound too English, Duo should nevertheless accept the answer as correct one, since there is no 'the' in Italian version. At last, maybe I am using the same shampoo in each and every bathroom in general. This sounds absolutely legit to me in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/obitonye

Why is 'my' there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SporadicAspirant

my isn't unsuitable for the context.

Articles and other small words such as possessive pronouns differ in their usage in various languages, so it may be appropriate at times to either drop or include them.

For this sentence, if you prefer, you can instead include the definite article. "I have the shampoo in the bathroom," and the sentence will be accepted (in fact the page shows me this as the main translation).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmarzw

Finally a context in which talking about shampoo makes sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Undina

Ma lo sciampo è dolce!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasFAustria

I wrote "in MY bathroom" and it was not accepted. Last sentence "ho ... in cucina" was translated to "I have... in my kitchen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rosa_tofu

I wrote "I have shampoo in the bath" and it corrected me to "I have shampoo in the loo." Seriously? Bagno has been bath every other time??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

rosa_tofu: Uhh, looks like you loo-se. Seriously it's ridiculous you were marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraGalesa

Their correction is even more ridiculous, at least in British English, where loo means toilet (the item).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gh0stwheel

But bagno is also a euphemism for toilet.
Same as you might ask "where is the bathroom?"
when you actually want the toilet...
So it's not that ridiculous; I can see where their mistake came from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kylonidas

then i wrote in the loo and the sistem correct to bathroom wtf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

kylonidas: You loo-se. :-(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/truthseeker491

I wrote the same and it corrected me with " I have the shampoo in the bathroom"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gordon_gregory

Duolingo changes it's mind about "shampoo" and "sciampo" all the time. The inconsistency is annoying. They want us to guess -- stupid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuerraAmanda

Well, using only "sciampo" I never had to guess xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gwinters

When I spent a month in Rome, I needed to buy some shampoo. It was referred to as "la doccia" But neither Duolingo nor Google translate acknowledges that word. Sono pazzo io??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Secondo me, non sei pazzo! Google also gives the word an English spelling. In Bologna last summer I bought a bottle of shampoo and it used that spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mstone01501

All I was going to say was "that's a good place for it."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haircut100_girl

I learnt british english and the sistem didn't accepted the word toilet instead of bathroom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SporadicAspirant

British English:

Toilet: lavatory. The toilet itself, or the room which contains it. Does not contain bathtub or shower (or at least, if it does, they are entirely irrelevant to the purpose of the communication, which is not the case here).

Bathroom: room with a bathtub or shower in it. May contain other facilities.

The American use of bathroom in some situations to mean what the British call a toilet, does not mean that the British always use the word toilet to refer to a room with a bath in it.

Most British people would think that a toilet is a very odd place to keep shampoo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

SporadicAspirant: In America 'toilet' refers to the commode, not the room where the commode is located. If someone said "I've got to go to the toilet," s/he'd mean..., well you know what s/he means. On the other hand if someone said "I've got to go to the bathroom," it could mean either to wash their hands, shave, etc. as well as you-know-what, more likely the latter. In public places the term you'd hear is "restroom."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SporadicAspirant

This I know - my comment does not state otherwise. All I state is one of the uses of bathroom in American English (when in British English toilet instead can be used) does not mean that toilet in British English is appropriate in all cases.

My definitions are British English, as stated in the first two words of the post. They are definitions not translations from one English to another. I have edited the post to make this even clearer.

The person to whom I responded had written toilet believing it to be correct in British English for bathroom in American English, which in some situations it is. However, because of context, it is not likely to be correct in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelThom27190

ah this is where they have got toilet from - quite funny really, it just shows you how nuance can make a real difference. I agree in British English having shampoo in the toilet is very odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Directioner5ever

What???? I'm italian and we never write "sciampo" but "shampoo" !!!! We use "shampoo" too and this is a big big big mistake!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/181996zuzu

Why is it "in my bathroom" when in italian there is no "in mio bagno"?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Context would tell you that and when given only a single sentence as here, context is a bit flexible. As for their being no "mio" in the italian, languages differ in their use or omission of articles and possessive adjectives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Directioner5ever

I'M IN ITALIAN AND IN ITALY WE DON'T USE "SCIAMPO" BUT "SHAMPOO" TOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!! IT IS A TERRIBLE MISTAKE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Umm, I'm not an Italian, but your "yelling" in all caps does not really improve the acceptance/credibility of your statement. You may well be right that "sciampo" isn't commonly used or even a mistake, but then just report it as a mistake. And I would not call that a "terrible" mistake either. A terrible mistake for me is for instance, if you have a decimal point at the wrong position in the dose description of a medical drug that makes it a lethal overdose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GUNEC

the answer says in my bathroom. why???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

GUNEC: My answer above says "the bathroom". If yours says "my bathroom" then Duo's assuming a context in which it'd be obvious the speaker was referring to his/her own bathroom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sglynn

duolingo says - I have shampoo in the loo! Whats going on?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulaMagee1

why does it say, i have shampoo in the loo... when i said..i have shampoo in the bath..... i think i am right...loo...we do not use loo...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

PaulaMagee: In England in lieu of bath, Brits (I believe) use loo, even in Bath. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naseem200170

Why in and not nel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

"THERE IS" shampoo in the bathroom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IamRegine

I guess "there is shampoo in the bathroom" is "c'e lo sciampo in bagno"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LatecomerLaurie

"Ho" is first person singular of the verb "avere," meaning "I have."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natusmundi

Wouldn't "I KEEP the shampoo in the bathroom" be correct as well? At least I think I remember duolingo offering it in these cases as alternate solution.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IamRegine

I guess "I keep the shampoo in the bathroom" is "tengo lo sciampo in bagno"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MABBY

In the previous lesson, "bagno" was a tub.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeslam1

Actually, "vasca" means tub.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Interrobang3

Well as of today you have a 666-day streak. Congrats, Satan! Here's a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MABBY

Thank -you! I'll send a minor demon around to pick it up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sapolion

Based on this video of the Giorgio Gaber song, I always thought it was "lo shampoo" in Italian: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wo0aXVATJ9Q


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klaas_Damsko

This sentence is "Ho lo sciampo in bagno." while another sentence in this section is "Gli sciampi sono nel bagno.". I understand "in il" becomes "nel", but which of these two forms to use, are they both common and correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

I thought 'shampoo' was a gag gift like fake turds? No?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaIramendy

Sciampo as well as shampoo are acceptable according to the dictionary. Please discuss


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Marial...Look, the way I see it: sciampo or shampoo, it's a wash! :-) [Thanks!]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanychee

i got corrected that it's "in MY bathroom", and there isn't a posessive in the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Vanychee: Without a possessive it's assumed that it's in this case the subject's bathroom. The same's true of articles of clothing which don't require a possessive if it's the subjects. If in this example the shampoo were in someone else's bathroom, then you'd find the appropriate possessive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejhalbrook

This sentence sounds so funny. I couldn't get over it. Lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MasqueArt

Worst pick up line, ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrPatTeti

I tried "I have the shampoo in bathroom" just to see what would happen and it said I missed a word - that the correct solution is "I have the shampoo in my bathroom." That's odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

SrPatTeti, yes, what you tried is incorrect. I think the assumption out of context is that it's your bathroom, which allows for Duo's translation. Otherwise "in THE bathroom" should be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesieJ-bon

I really thought shampoo was shampoo everywhere in the world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaspberryBlue_It

It is not sciampo. Here it is written shampoo on the bottles. In the newspapers too. Sciampo can be found only in texts written by uneducated people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charmalotte

I still don't understand the rules about when to use "in" or "nel"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaColl738835

I wish we could have correct English translations. This must be so confusing for learnings for whom English is not their native tongue. This sentence should read I have shampoo in the bathroom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inksi

Why can't I use BATH instead of Bathroom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gh0stwheel

Two options:

  • Because it is ambiguous. Bath is used for the room / tub.
    This skill / lesson is teaching the difference between "bagno"
    and "vasca da bagno". So it has to be more strict than real life.
  • Because the contributors haven't thought of every possible alternative answer.
    That is why you can use the 🏴 Report button that is under the answer,
    and choose "My answer should be accepted".

Here is how:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vergily

It is to be "nel bagno" for "in the bathroom" and "in bagno" for "in bathroom", init?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve751225

My “...in the bath” was rejected. In American English “bath” can mean both bath and bathroom, eg in real estate ads, so context should have made it clear that “bath” meant “bathroom”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jo.Ke.Ro.

Tiny Cards (Duolingo's other app) teaches 'the shampoo' as 'lo shampoo' so I'm a little confused and don't know who to believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerald261380

When i type 'bath', it is wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brenda99189

"I have shampoo in the bathtub." would be a more typical way to express this in English. The word "the" before shampoo isn't needed in English yet is is marked incorrect without it.

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