"Khi ấy trở lại, ấy hạnh phúc hơn tôi nghĩ."

Translation:When she returns, she is happier than I think.

10 months ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas457134

where did the "than" come from?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vngdhuyen
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"hơn" usually means more [adjective], but it could also implies more [adjective] than.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
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The literal meaning of the accepted English answer is so unlikely ever to be said that I truly wonder what the Vietnamese means to a native speaker. (With all the present tenses, the English has to mean that she returns regularly and, when she does, she is happier than I think her to be (either at that point in time or as a customary state of affairs). I doubt this is what the Vietnamese means.)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vngdhuyen
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context in VNmese sentences is a major key to understand a time frame, not always their loose syntax. if I were to translate from VNmese to English, I would use the simple past here: "when she came back, she was happier than I thought." it's in the past because I am obviously telling you right now what has happened, and it's not a repeated action as it would have mentioned it somehow (mỗi khi, những lần, etc.)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
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Thank you very much. That makes sense. (Unfortunately Duo won't let us vary the tenses.)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
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The English "present tense" can also refer to the future: "I'm going out tomorrow", "After I eat breakfast tomorrow I'll brush my teeth".

But this English sentence doesn't fit either of those. It's indeed quite unnatural.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julestheman
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Dan, you couldn't have explained the problem with this sentence any better!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duane753474

Here are two more logical options: 1. when she returns, she is happier. (this is an objective statement as seen/known by an observer/narrator). 2. when she returned, she was happier than I thought. (i.e. I thought one thing, but subsequently found out I was wrong).

The weird option given here "when she returns, she is happier than i think" is almost a "God's-eye view" because only he would know both how happy she is and how happy I think she is, and the fact that she's actually happier than I think she is. In other words, a sentence highly unlikely to ever be used in English, and it isn't clear what was intended to be conveyed in Vietnamese.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Songve

I didn't believe the translation using than so I threw it through the Google translator...same as above. Call me baffled how the hơn ends up "than" and makes happy into happier simultaneously. Is there a term for this double dipping ?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan553966
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"More happy than" <=> "happier than."

5 months ago
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