"Mes filles comprennent la lettre."

Translation:My daughters understand the letter.

April 2, 2018

36 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizzie898860

I think either girls or daughters should be accepted. It’s common in the US to refer to your daughters as my girls or the girls. One could also be referring to girls who are not daughters. It might be obvious in context, but what if it’s not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadowPrxncess

Fille means both daughter and girl, but when you use a possessive, it changes from girl to daughter. The same rule follows with femme which can mean wife or woman. Hope this helps :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WendyBoynt

thank you, this helps, we are not learning English here, we are learning French...different rules for different languages. French rules both language and culture don't necessarily make sense in English or USA.


[deactivated user]

    This may be true in French, but is not necessarily so in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenishaTra

    I put "My girls understand the letter" why is this incorrect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David_Metroland

    Please please check previous comments AND explanations before you ask the same question. ;-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueMac13puisse

    I, too, wrote 'My girls understand the letter.' People do refer to their daughters as 'my girls'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadowPrxncess

    Fille means both daughter and girl, but when you use a possessive, it changes from girl to daughter. The same rule follows with femme which can mean wife or woman. Hope this helps :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ratchet111653

    Sounds more like "les lettres" than "la lettre" to me...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

    I agree. the pronunciation of la is a halfway house between le and les. I chose les first time (because lettre is feminine) and got caught in the trap. Infuriating.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lex___

    So is fille used for both 'girl' and 'daughter'..? or is there another word normally used for 'daughter'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadowPrxncess

    Fille means both daughter and girl, but when you use a possessive, it changes from girl to daughter. The same rule follows with femme which can mean wife or woman. Hope this helps :)


    [deactivated user]

      This may be true in French, but is not necessarily so in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brian648024

      Daughters/girls. Really Duo? Time to learn English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadowPrxncess

      Fille means both daughter and girl, but when you use a possessive, it changes from girl to daughter. The same rule follows with femme which can mean wife or woman. Hope this helps :)


      [deactivated user]

        This may be true in French, but is not necessarily so in English.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

        I sometimes call my daughter (or my wife - or even the old dog) "my girl" but I recognise all three usages for what they are: non-standard. It is all right in informal speech, but you have to admit it lacks precision.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rushnrocket

        Until now fille was girl, if Duo wants us to use a different form should not we be introduced to it first?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadowPrxncess

        Fille means both daughter and girl, but when you use a possessive, it changes from girl to daughter. The same rule follows with femme which can mean wife or woman. Hope this helps :)


        [deactivated user]

          This may be true in French, but is not necessarily so in English.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jar598136

          Yes,why girls is not accepted


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShadowPrxncess

          Fille means both daughter and girl, but when you use a possessive, it changes from girl to daughter. The same rule follows with femme which can mean wife or woman. Hope this helps :)


          [deactivated user]

            This may be true in French, but is not necessarily so in English.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David_Metroland

            PLEASE, read previous comments and responses BEFORE re-posting the same query!


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alaisL

            Why is it that in the "Mes garçons" item, "My boys" and "My sons" are both accepted, but here, "My girls" is not accepted?


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee821050

            A previous question accepted "my boys" for "mes garçons"!


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LawrenceEbo

            Why is 'understood' wrong the letter


            [deactivated user]

              "understood" refers to something that happened in the past; the French sentence uses a present tense form of the verb, so it needs to be translated as "understand".


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkMcDonn3

              When playing the audio the male speaker has a definitive pause between "compren" and "nent". Why is that? It sounds like a purposeful split in the middle of the sentence?

              "Mes filles compren" then "nent la lettre"


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenniferge484578

              Thank you i understand


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karan292030

              Y it is comprennent? And not comprenons or something else


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkMcDonn3

              Because the reference to girls is "3rd person plural". I've found the following patterns seem to apply.

              Singular...

              1st person -e

              2nd person -s

              3rd person -e

              Plural...

              1st person -ons;

              2nd person -ez;

              3rd person -ent

              For example:

              Singular...

              1st person (i: je) mange

              2nd person (you: tu) mange-s

              3rd person (he, she: il, elle) mange

              Plural...

              1st person (we: nous) mange-ons;

              2nd person (you: vous) mange-z;

              3rd person (they: ils, elles) mange-nt


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WendyBoynt

              Thank you Mark, I agree, for regular verbs...this is helpful.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/divaluisa

              The voice does not sound different for "mes fils" or "mes filles"
              I wrote "mes fils" Based on what we hear is this wrong?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erstedame

              What if you were coaching a girl's football team and you wanted to say in a familiar way that the girls on the team understand the game? In English you would say "my girls understand the game." is there a way to express a possessive relationship without the meaning changing to "daughter?"

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