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  5. "Un autre mord la poussière."

"Un autre mord la poussière."

Translation:Another one bites the dust.

April 3, 2018

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Don_Mateo

I just came here for Queen comments, thank you :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrasNemes

bada boom boom boom "Un autre mord la poussière".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jered78

Is this idiom common in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timberhawk

Steve marche prudemment dans la rue ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maltagerr

et un autre est parti, et un autre est parti, un autre mord la poussire


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blastus1

Nice. How do you say 'kudos' in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arash226635

Despite the discussion above i still don't get the context for using such a sentence. The translation is probably obvious to native English. But even the links did not clarity it for me. Can someone explain please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jo1Ob2

"Biting the dust" is what happens when you fall face first into the dirt. It can mean a few things: for a person to die (though that would be a very crude way saying it - do not use at a funeral!), a machine to break, or in the case of the Queen song, for a competitor to lose/fall out of the competition. https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/bites+the+dust


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

According to Word Reference, "mordre la poussière" means "to lose, to suffer a defeat" (https://www.wordreference.com/fren/mordre%20la%20poussi%C3%A8re). Can it also mean "to fail" and "to be killed", as the English idiom ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Le-petit-loup

I believe the expression originates with horses rather than humans. Imagine a horse running along, when suddenly its legs give out and it collapses. When it falls, its mouth hits the ground and so, in a way, it "bites the dust." It is a euphemism for death under exertion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArielleSaw1

I love that it has the same amount of syllables in english and french!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim606185

Formidable! Un un autre idiome mord la poussière :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pogosticksteve

Doesn't sound quite as brutal in French


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chriswalli8

The plosive 'b' and 'd' in English give the phrase urgency and violence, whereas the softer 'm' and particularly the '...oussiere' have the opposite effect. But I suppose with practice- I have, you can tell - you could sing this rhymically in time to Queen as as 'Un-au-tremord la-pouss-iere' whicjih is what they do 'An - oth - erone bites-the -dust'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimmyPeque1

I answered another bites the dust, also got correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArpsTnd

What does this sentence mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David_Metroland

[With all due respect - and without a timestamp on comments] may I suggest you read existing responses before commenting(?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ademirbp1

And another one goes... and another goes...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qwentarie

Kira Queen Daisan no Bakudan Bites Za Dusto! ^_^

Can't believe I found a JoJo reference on Duolingo. That's nice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S.Ghosh3

"Another one is defeated" is not accepted. Doesn't it mean the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klgregonis

Well, sort of, but bites the dust has more of a meaning than defeated. You can say it about something you've thrown out - say, you're cleaning out your closet and throwing away clothes. As you toss something into the garbage can, you say - another one bites the dust. The piece of clothing isn't defeated. it's gone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandraVerts1

And another one bites, and another ones bites, another one bites the dust


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaWin2

I don't understand, this phrase either in English or French. Is it a metaphor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chriswalli8

It’s a song by Queen. I think the metaphor comes from cowboy movies when a baddy gets shot and comes off their horse head first into the dusty track or desert. It’s a metaphor for your enemies being destroyed.

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