"Bitte diesen Hinweis beachten."

Translation:Please consider this tip.

April 20, 2014

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artischocke

Would I be wrong in thinking that Hinweis in this context (rather official-sounding) means something along the lines of direction/instruction/information rather than just 'hint'?

April 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorrisoMW

You are entirely right. This wording is mostly used in an official context, therefore you have more of an instruction here, than a hint. For example the "Hinweis" could be not to use some plate in a microwave.

April 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artischocke

Thanks. I used the closest one from the hover-over hints (indication) but was marked wrong. I've reported it.

April 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Piervito0

Is "advice" wrong?

March 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorrisoMW

I would translate "advice" as "Rat", but I think it is ok in this sentence.

April 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bacam1lgr4u

Why doesn't "pay attention to this tip, please" work? I thought it was right.

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorrisoMW

It should be accepted, report it!

August 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaB_Duolingo

Struggling here. This sounds like an odd thing to say in English.

It may well be a correct 'decoding' of the German, but what would an English person actually say in the same context?

How close is this to: Please take note. ....?

:)

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorrisoMW

"(etwas) beachten" is very similar to "to take note (of sth.)". The English "Please take note:" is quite similar to "Bitte beachten:", but usually you have to specify, what to take note of.

So if you use "beachten" in a complete sentence you need to add, that you're going to take note of the "Hinweis".

I think "Please take note:", "Bitte beachten:" and "Bitte diesen Hinweis beachten:" are all quite similar. The latter is just a bit more formal, but doesn't add much to the meaning of the sentence.

July 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaB_Duolingo

Thanks, Sorriso

I understand; so 'beachten' needs a DO. The problem is to translate 'Hinweis' and still get realistic English.

If you plug 'Hinweis' into Context Reverso, the most common translation is 'Note' - as in the noun. So - diesen Hinweis beachten - is - take note of this note.

Which, of course, sounds daft.

'Hint' doesn't work - the register is completely off.

In the absence of a better translation for Hinweis, I'm going to think of it as 'please take note'.

Still open to suggestions, though. Oh, and hints.

:)

July 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorrisoMW

I would agree with that. It is just more natural in English to omit the "Hinweis" than in German. So maybe this sentence is not the best candidate for a one-to-one-translation as Duo needs.

PS: Linguee says the same:

http://www.linguee.de/deutsch-englisch/search?source=auto & query=hinweis+beachten

http://www.linguee.de/deutsch-englisch/search?source=auto & query=diesen+hinweis+beachten

With the second query you get translations like "Please consider this advice" or "Please notice this consideration". But as you can see the upcoming translations are very diverse.

Edit: Does someone know how to link to urls with a & in it? You'll just have to copy it then...

July 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

For really long links, you should probably use a url shortening thingie like tinyurl.com

August 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Since I went there too, and was amused to see many (presumably) professional translators also struggling with the phrase, let's see if I can make the link work: (http://www.linguee.com/english-german/search?source=auto&query=bitte+beachten+diesen+Hinweis&cw=336)

October 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uberling

Why does it use the accusative "diesen"?

August 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gufinoverde

The short answer is because "beachten" is a transitive verb and, therefore, needs a D.O., which is in the accusative. Hence "diesen Hinweis."

September 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uberling

That's even easier. Thanks.

September 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artischocke

That's a good question. The reason is that the reader (the person to whom this sentence is being addressed), although tacit, is the subject (and therefore nominative) and Hinweis the object (and therefore in the accusative). If we make the subject explicit, the sentence would read "Bitte beachten Sie diesen Hinweis", which is grammatically equivalent to the original.

August 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uberling

Sigh. Anyone who learns German knows there is no God....

But thanks! At least I understand the explanation, even though I'm dubious I'll be able to put it into practice for a while....

August 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artischocke

Fortunately the "null subject" is rather limited in usage in German as opposed to Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and a bunch other languages, where its usage is very widespread. In German it is most common/prevalent in imperative sentences like this one and in very colloquial speech. Once you learn the 3 imperative verb endings it's not that big a deal :)

From Wikipedia: «In German, the informal form du may be added to the imperative in a colloquial manner for emphasis (Mach du das, you do it). The formal imperative requires the addition of the subject Sie (as in Machen Sie das) because the formal, addressee-specific imperative form of a verb is morphologically identical to the infinitive, which when used by itself belongs in final position and indicates a "neutral" or addressee-nonspecific imperative (e.g., "Bitte nicht stören" ["Please do not disturb"]).»

August 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uberling

At least that's encouraging! Thanks.

August 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lingolizard

"Notice" was accepted as translation for "beachten" in the other exercises ...

November 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artischocke

Surely we can agree that the same word can have slightly or starkly different meanings depending on the context (Leo cites 23 different meanings for 'beachten'). I would say that given the imperative in this context, the meaning of 'beachten' is closer to 'follow', 'observe', 'take heed' or 'pay regard' to an instruction.

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lingolizard

Yes, we can agree on that. I am not arguying that "notice" is the most natural translation in this context, just that it should be accepted if it isn't wrong. I don't see how it is wrong, because you could easily say "please notice this tip" in English

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henkaipantomime

In most of the things I read "Hinweis" seems to be more like a reference, like in a footnote. Is that not a good translation?

July 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WorthingtonSusan

i think "please take this advice" should be accepted because it is a colloquialism.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EranWhetst

Can I say "be careful of this tip"?

May 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmundoTeacher

"Please regard the instruction" was simply rendered false. Hmm...

May 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puett

Now Duo says "suggestion"! which means Vorschlag in German. The correct translation is: Please take notice of this instruction.

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbedLatifi

Sorry! I wrote "please notice this tip"and it was wrong, just tell me why!!!?

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wibbleypants

Yet again baffled by the word order. The first three words are one grammatical unit?

September 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artischocke

Not really, no. The verb is placed in last position in such sentences conveying instructions or directives with infinitives. Compare with English: Please take the trash out [please + verb inf. + object]. German: [please + object + verb inf.] But note that German is more flexible with word order in such sentences. Equally valid: Bitte beachten [Sie] diesen Hinweis! and Hinweis beachten! See the last section in http://www.dartmouth.edu/~deutsch/Grammatik/Imperative/Imperativ.html

September 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BbxU8

Thank you! I was trying to figure out how this verb (without Sie) was created and your link answered my question.

August 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aerizz

I wrote "advise", instead of "advice" and it was reported as wrong. Note: I am not a native English speaker, so I might be missing out on something here

September 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marian150342

‘Advice’ is a noun. The advice. ‘Advise’ is a verb. I advise you. Different pronunciation also.

April 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wibbleypants

Maybe it's a pondian thing, as over there they confuse practise with practice and license with licence.

April 26, 2018
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