https://www.duolingo.com/Nikhusar

How does one become fluent in German?

I'm wondering is it possible to become fluent in German by just using Duolingo, or is there any other ways to reach it? And if so what would they be?

What tactics and study techniques have you used to become fluent in German?

April 4, 2018

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Raisinnoir

I would learn vocabulary, word order, and grammar in that order. The best way ro become fluent is to talk with a native speaker and let them correct your mistakes ( we all make them ). I would also suggest reading German very often.. A good book by Hermann Hesse is "Knulp" which I had to read in college. There are really no tricks to become fluent. It takes time, dedication and above al practice. Ich wuenche dir viel Erfolg!

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kay.lee.831

You should definitely use other resources. I'm struggling with just the Duo course, but I have a close family friend who speaks German and helps me with it sometimes. I think it's best to find someone who speaks the language you are learning, so they can help and correct you. Also: study, study, and study!! Make goals. My goal is to learn at least 5 new German words a day. Write them down on notecards so you won't forget.

You can also listen to music and read children's books in German. I hope this helped :))))) (Oh, and don't rely on the fluency meter on here.) Happy learning!

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/exp271828

I see you're level 18 in German ... not sure where you are in the tree, but that's a pretty good level! You might start looking at web sites like dw.com (which has a tab for learning German), maybe watch some of the Kinder videos on ard.de (many of these have German language subtitles, which, unfortunately, are not in real good sync with what's being said), or doing a Google search for "Deutsch Extra Youtube" (again, turn on German language subtitles) to watch some fun videos. I also have someone I meet with on a periodic basis to talk or read aloud in German, which really helps - one of my favorite bookstores downtown has some German language magazines and a few books in German, some of which are quite fun.

Duo has put me on the path towards becoming fluent, but I don't think I'm really there yet. However, I am starting to see something of a snowball effect, where stuff I've learned before, is making the next set of stuff I learn easier.

Bottom line: I use anything and everything I can to immerse myself in as much German stuff as I can, as often as I can. I try to keep it fun, I recognize the difference between being fluent and being proficient in a language (proficient is more skilled than just fluent). I'm patient with myself - learning something as complicated as a language, takes time. Finally, I don't worry about things like streaks in Duo or the Fluency Metric number that Duo gives you ... because Duo only knows what I do in Duo, and doesn't know what I'm learning outside of it. And yes, I still have to look up lots of vocabulary - it feels like I've looked up some words a bazillion times before they finally "clicked" (chuckle), and there are lots more that haven't clicked yet.

So just dive in, make mistakes (if you're not making mistakes, you're not doing anything - to err is human!), have some fun, and enjoy the language!

April 5, 2018
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