"Il a un troisième œil sur le front."

Translation:He has a third eye on his forehead.

April 5, 2018

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Seanathon23

He's Sparky-Sparky-Boom-Man!

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MightyAthena

Guys a little culture info in hinduism, there is actually a god who has a third eye, he is 'Shiv'. He is the god of many things mostly death. But people pray to him with love. So in a way, a lovable version of Hades. In India, lord shiv comes to mind whenever any mention of third eye is talked about. And when that opens, bad things could happen. It is also associated with him seeing everything.

June 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GAURAVPARI6

A tiny correction, 'Shiv' (शिव) is the God of destruction, not death. Yes, there is a difference.

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottSwink

It's more natural in English to say "in his forehead." Your eyes are in your head, not on your head.

September 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

My eyes are on my face and not in my head. My brain is in my head. The part of my eyes that you can see are on my face.

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

But we never say our eyes are on our heads.

He has eyes in the back of his head.

Do you not have eyes in your head?

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

This sentence uses “forehead” which is a part of the “face”, not “head.” My eyes are part of my head, but they are not completely in my head. Much of my eyes are visible on my face. Be careful with the word “never”, and define the word “we” whenever you can. Yes, “eyes in the back of his head” is an established expression. Now, think about “forehead” which is already not in your head, but on the front of it.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

That is a ridiculous statement since the face itself is part of the head.

Unless the entirety of the eye is on the outside of the forehead, not inset, the preposition should be 'in'.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

I have heard “on the forehead”, but the most common thing to say about a third eye is that it is “in the center of the forehead.” You should try reporting it.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/StefanStoj5

I've only heard he has an eye on the back of his head. And also I've only heard your eyes are on your head, never in.

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/marie927342

We're not learning Englisb

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/marie927342

English

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

We may not be learning English but it doesn't help us to learn French if we have to use incorrect English to translate it.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Nngpi

The creators of this course are a bit headstrong unfortunately, they also refuse to make 'kids' an acceptable option to translate 'enfants' because they believe English speakers still speak as they did two hundred years ago.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

They don’t accept “kids” for “enfants” because it is casually used and translates to “gamins” or “gamines”.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

Actually, I have to agree with them on that one. 'Enfants' is the French equivalent of 'children' and 'gamins' is the equivalent of 'kids'. There is a difference between insisting on direct translation between directly translatable words, which should be acceptable, and insisting on translation to an incorrect structure.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Nngpi

I know they are each other's textbook equivalents. However, a French speaker is far more likely to say 'enfants', whereas an English speaker is far more likely to say 'kids'. As such, the insistence on direct translation actually teaches the opposite of what it sets out to. It doesn't teach "there is a difference in formality between 'enfants' and 'gamins'", instead it teaches "you should say 'gamins' in virtually all circumstances", which a French speaker most definitely doesn't do.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

A lot of English people also don't use 'kids' as a general rule. I certainly don't.

I don't believe DL is trying to force you to speak formally when you wish to be informal. It is trying to tell you that, if someone is speaking formally, you should respect that that is what they are doing. If someone says 'enfants' and you translate it as 'kids', you are detracting from the respect he/she was giving in their speech.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

I think you may be blanket applying your idea of English to the entirety of the English speaking world. Where I live, we most definitely still have quite noticeable formal/informal distinctions and, as such, I personally appreciate DLs ability to distinguish the two.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

Perhaps if they were to change the French sentence, “dans” = “in”, but I think they say “dans le tête” but “sur le front”.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

No, the fact that the French say 'sur' is a fact of the language. Translation isn't about changing one to suit the other, it's about saying it correctly on both sides.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Nngpi

I think you misunderstood what I was trying to say. The problem is not that the course tries to teach a difference between formal/informal speech, it's that it tries to apply the French formal/informal difference to modern English, which has nearly no such difference at all anymore. In French, you don't speak informally unless you're close friends or otherwise of the same young age. In English, with the near total lack of formality markers, these restrictions are a lot more lax.

Formality in itself is a pretty stupid concept (which is probably why it has a tendency to disappear over time), but if you want to teach it, you shouldn't apply it 1:1 on a language which, for all intents and purposes, got rid of its formal/informal distinction a long time ago.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/chriswalli8

Where I live we call them 'ankle biters' until they're about 6.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Nngpi

chriswalli8 (the reply buttons have disappeared below), you should look into the usage of 'youse' again. The spelling differs (yous, you's, you'se, ...) as it isn't standardised and non-standard words often get self-censored when written down, but it's used not only in Liverpool, but in the rest of the northern part of England, Scotland, Ireland, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and even the US. I did mention that it isn't considered to be 'correct', though, and it certainly isn't used by a majority of English speakers. Regardless, I was simply trying to draw a parallel by aggressively making a distinction that many native speakers would rarely do.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/chriswalli8

Nngpi Re youse. I lived in liverpool for ten years and it was common. I've lived in Manchester for 25 years and never heard it. I was born in Scotland and whilst it may be common in Glasgow, which has a lot in common with Liverpool - Irish immigration, Cathoilc and Protestant football teams etc - I've not heard it in Edinburgh.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Nngpi

I assure you it isn't anywhere near as severe as the distinction in Romance languages, let alone that in Slavic languages. I have nothing against being taught the rules of formality, so long as those rules aren't retroactively applied to another language. It's like if the course taught that the difference between 'tu' and 'vous' is like the difference between 'you' and 'youse/y'all', which is technically correct (if we forget that 'you' used to be exclusively plural) and correct for a significant amount of native English speakers, but then it would only accept 'youse' or 'y'all' as a correct translation for 'vous'. Not a perfect example because 'youse' and 'y'all' aren't considered to be "correct" and it doesn't take capital 'Vous' into account, but I hope it's clear enough. You're right that I'm making blanket statements, but so is the course.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/chriswalli8

Just to say, youse in English English is a Liverpudlian dialect word for you, plural, but not heard anywhere else in the UK. Y'all is strictly US English. never heard in UK.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Stanpa2

The 3 eyed raven from Game of thrones?

May 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert.Edward

Why not 'it has'?

April 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ian116730

Why not" It has a third eye on the forehead"(eg on a sculpture

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Hens903971

Should be right as well, reported!

May 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardHoma

Good question. You could be talking about a tuatara.

December 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rickdeckard71

why not "He has a third eye in his forehead" ?

September 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

“on” is the right preposition for this sentence.

October 1, 2018

[deactivated user]

    Is this idiomatic? I was thinking it might be comparable to a saying in English like "he has eyes in the back of his head."

    September 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Bella473197

    He's Blinky the three eyed fish! ;)

    October 17, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/koreanjesu5

    Sparky sparky boom man?

    December 11, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/KarenSpark5

    Can someone please explain the process/logic to get from œil to yeux?

    January 10, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

    This is an irregular plural. We might understand how the plural of one hair “cheveu” can become “des cheveux” and a coat “un manteau” can become “des manteaux”, but in French nouns ending in ‘l’ can get a plural ending with an ‘x’ also, “un cheval” becomes “des chevaux” and “un travail” becomes “des travaux”.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/french/grammar/nouns/pluralsrev1.shtml

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C5%93il

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/yeux

    http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/œil

    There is a y sound in the pronunciation of œil, so although the shape of the words are very different, I could see how with time the vowel sound might have disappeared from the beginning of the plural.

    January 10, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/kr..edw

    why is it translated with "his" forehead and not "the" forehead?

    February 23, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3

    In English when we use the possessive, which is commonly used for body parts, the French use the definite article for body parts instead.

    February 23, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/chriswalli8

    You're all too young to have heard of Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, I think.

    April 10, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Roody-Roo

    This is definitely the worst comment thread on the French tree.

    April 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/unbekannt1011010

    -So was it fun on Chernobyl? - I can see 4D boi, yea!

    April 28, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/erikrichert

    "He has a third eye on his forehead." This is not a good English translation. This, to me, implies that he has two other eyes externally "on" him somewhere as opposed to the eyes in his head (unless this is the intent of the French phrase). If this means there is a third eye embedded in his forehead then it should be: "He has a third eye in his forehead."

    May 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/StefanStoj5

    I've never heard eyes in the head, only on the head, especially with a third eye.

    April 8, 2019
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