"In Japan, people eat with chopsticks."

Translation:Au Japon, les gens mangent avec des baguettes.

April 5, 2018

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Nicholas-norfre

I find it really funny that chopsticks translates to the same word that would mean baguettes xD

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

Actually, the long skinny loaves of bread got that name because they resemble sticks! And if that wasn't enough, "baguette" is also the stick that a conductor uses to lead his orchestra ("Orquestre de la Suisse Romande sous la baguette d'Ernest Ansermet")

April 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tracey_morgan

A conductor brandishes a baton in English! SOOO much scope for confusion :-)

May 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicholas-norfre

Oh! Thank you for the information! It's kind of funny still, but now I'm wiser :)

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jwl99

Since this is a generalization, wouldn't it be correct to say "avec les baguettes"?

April 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Li-loid

Well that would suggest that the whole population uses a specific set of chopsticks. It's best to use the partitive article here.

May 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/landmers

Come on France! Couldn't you just call them chopsticks?

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

That's an interesting point. French--no less than English--doesn't hesitate to borrow from numerous other languages whenever it likes in search of a better word: English (leader), Arabic (macabre), Italian (grosso modo), Hindi/Urdu (k[h]aki), and even Hebrew (shoah). However, this student doesn't expect "chopsticks" to enter Larousse anytime soon (let alone a better word for salad dressing than "sauce"! :-( ).

French also has borrowed from Japanese (kamikaze = "suicide bomber"); perhaps someday Le Monde might be persuaded to substitute "hashi" or "hachi" as a classier substitute for "baguette."

November 13, 2018
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