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  5. "SuvwI' HoS ghaH."

"SuvwI' HoS ghaH."

Translation:She is a strong warrior.

April 6, 2018

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

Here is a case of HoS being translated as powerful.

April 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Odd. As far as I can see, the last edit to this was three hours before your comment, by me, and it no longer has "powerful" there.

Perhaps edits take a while to go "live" on the public website.

Thanks for the report!

April 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pinpoint12

Is there any way to distinguish if ghaH is 'she is' or 'he is'? Because the translation when I hover over it says 'he is' or 'she is' both work.

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

English has a convenient way to divide people in a way that sometimes helps to simplify conversation. When there is only one male or one female being referred to you can just use the gender specific pronoun. But what if you are talking about 2 men?
The two friends, Dick and John, stood in front of the train.
"I don't want you to go," he said.
"Stop whining," he said.

English can run into the same problem and has the same solutions. Sometimes you just can't use the pronouns and still be clear.

By the way, the opposite problem happens with "you". I'm sure Klingon students of English ask:
"Is there any way to distinguish if you is SoH or tlhIH? Because the translation when I hover over it says SoH or tlhIH both work."

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

But what if you are talking about 2 men?

Then an English writer wouldn't rely on pronouns to distinguish either. And that's the point: in English some writers will rely on this difference without even realizing it, or even completely intentionally. When translating into other languages, it's this sort of difference that alters the impact of a passage. There's a reason we have the phrase He said, she said. It's not translatable into Klingon — or rather, if you translate it, it doesn't make any sense, and if you make it more specific, it loses its impact. The man said, the woman said doesn't have the same effect.

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidTrimb3

No, there is no way. It's remarkably difficult to make clear the gender of a person in Klingon without outright stating something like be' ghaH.

This causes problems with translations, because an English translator will often rely on the reader being able to distinguish between him and her without any other explanation.

The two lovers, Dick and Jane, stood in front of the train.

"I don't want you to go," he said.

"Stop whining," she said.

In Klingon, you don't know who said what if you translate without thinking:

lupwI' mIr tlhopDaq QamtaH cha' parmaqqay: Dick, Jane je.

«bImej vIneHbe',» jatlh.

«bIvIng 'e' yImev,» jatlh.

You are forced to add in the context yourself.

lupwI' mIr tlhopDaq QamtaH cha' parmaqqay: Dick, Jane je.

«bImej vIneHbe',» jatlh Dick.

«bIvIng 'e' yImev,» jatlh Jane.

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No.

Klingon doesn't have different pronouns depending on whether you're far-sighted or near-sighted, left-handed or right-handed, or depending on what's inside someone's pants. It's grammatically irrelevant to them.

January 16, 2019
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