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  5. "Nous méritons un bonbon."

"Nous méritons un bonbon."

Translation:We deserve a sweet.

April 9, 2018

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidShill3

An Australian child would not use candy (too American) or sweet (too British). It would be a lolly. So lolly ought to be permitted.

Examples: http://www.essentialbaby.com.au/forums/index.php?/topic/272989-of-lolly-bags-at-the-end-of-parties/

http://www.essentialbaby.com.au/forums/index.php?/topic/658515-is-an-appropriate-age-for-children-to-eat-lollies/

In fact for us "sweets" is generally the name for the final course of a meal, especially at home. See this ad for an example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmfIOHzLbmo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amydursun

"Lolly" not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ant.H

A lolly is a particular kind of sweet (on a stick). Bon bon could include anything from a mint humbug to a chocolate coated truffle to a stick of rock, so lolly is too specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amydursun

Here in Australia we refer to any kind of candy as "lolly", as in lolly isn't specific to a lollipop but to every candy (from the top of my head).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Don550357

Not in Australia cobber! A lolly is a generic terms that covers most forms of confectionery


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semaphoredm

In Australia a lolly is any kind of individual sugar confection. So in Australia would be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rBhr5

In Australia a 'lolly' doesn't have to be on a stick. A lolly on a stick is, in fact, called a 'lollipop' in Australia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marie927342

In the UK maybe. Not downunder


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Are you Australian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amydursun

Yes. I think British English uses "lolly" too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Runpote

yeah exactly the same thing that happened to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueBernard

"Piece of candy" was not accepted, although it has been accepted in other sections for "bonbon"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarrieSchu2

When your own hovertext defines a word as "a piece of candy", it's rather unsporting of you to claim that using it as a translation is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gloria112227

Lolly would be used in Australia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YESOUINONON

"We deserve a treat" ought to be a correct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivornovello

why not merit a sweet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse476887

Make "we deserve a lolly" accepted in Australia!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigWillyLad

"lolly" (and "lollies") should be accepted for bonbon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mohd.Kaif

How can we remember that 'méritons' means deserve


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidShill3

I remember it easily because in English for "we deserve a..." we can equally say "we merit a ..." so the French word "mériter" has a direct English equivalent - "to merit".

Typical English usage: "We merit a reward for...", "Don't we merit a smile for...", etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica_M_L

I believe candy should be accepted as well as lolly and the rest. Candy marked wrong sept 19 2018 and reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnmark85

Should "We deserve candy" be an acceptable translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InvertedGo

It accepts "...a candy". However, just "candy" would probably translate to "des bonbons".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JFSPA

In the US, one would say "a candy" or more likely "a piece of candy," not "a sweet."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonJaarsma

"We deserve a sweet" is so British. Americans say, "We deserve [some] candy." But then that's plural and not singular...

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