"Ellos se encuentran en la playa para caminar."

Translation:They meet up on the beach to walk.

7 months ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth985027

To walk, is the infinitive of the verb, so it can be used. Just because we actually don't speak standard English in most places doesn't mean it isn't correct, just that it isn't commonly used where you come from. They meet up on the beach to walk, is perfectly fine. Meet up, being a phrasal verb, is also correct but not necessary.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mprdo
mprdo
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MY, Ellos lo encuentran...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MasterYods
MasterYods
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Thanks

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaden482934
Jaden482934
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to take a walk is ok, but to have a walk is not?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gregorio_Blanco

They meet each other on the beach for a walk

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimHemsley1

I think this an example of a case that has a proper English translation very few native speakers would ever use, even to exactly express this idea. It was a tough translation for me because conceptually. I would most likely say "They meet for a walk along the beach," or "They meet on the beach for a walk". No "up", no infinitive "to walk", focus on "walk" as event to attend rather an activity to undertake.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@JimHemsley
I know it's tough. I feel you Mister Hensley. It is still tough for me after years of studying Spanish. But it gets easier to do the easy things in time. And the harder things will eventual get easier too. It just takes longer.

"For it is precept upon precept, precept upon precept, line upon line, line upon line, here a little, there a little."

~ Isaiah 28: 10

By the way, I am someone who would say, "They meet up on the beach to walk."

And also: "They meet on the beach to walk."

I am a native English speaking man.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kissmyteeth
kissmyteeth
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Why is "They meet up on the beach for a walk" wrong?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@kissmyteeth
I perceive a lesser issue when I examine your choice to say "...for a walk" instead of "...to walk." It is hard for me to find fault with this choice. But next time, if the spanish sentence shows you that you don't have to insert an a when you are constructing your next English translation, then I recommend that you don't. Instead, choose another colloquialism that fits better.

Or if you prefer not to follow my recommendation, then do it again. At least you will know why Duolingo does not like your translation.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hoogeveen19
Hoogeveen19
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Why do you need "se" in this sentence?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Hoogeveen19
I was confused at first. But now I understand your question.

Encontrarse is a pronominal verb.

encontrarse = to meet up

Pronominal Verbs are often incorrectly called reflexive verbs, when in reality reflexive verbs are just one type of pronominal verb. Reciprocal verbs are another type of pronominal verb you'll run across. In fact, you are running across this type of pronominal verb today because you are studying the Duolingo exercise that we are all discussing in this forum thread.

Pronominal verbs must be conjugated along with either a reciprical pronoun or with a reflexive pronoun. In the Duolingo exercise that we are all discussing in this forum thread, "...se..." is a reflexive pronoun. Edit: ...is a reciprical pronoun in this sentence:

"Ellos se encuentran en la playa para caminar."

Literal Translation: They find each other on the beach to walk. (But this is not colloquial English.)

Colloquial Translation: They meet up on the beach to walk.

https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-verb-types

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparkle1027

I was taught (Spanish from Spain) that "to meet up"= "Quedar"... google translate says "to meet up"= "reunirse" and that "quedar" = "stay"...?? Now Doulingo says "they meet up" = "encuentran". But doesn't that = "they find"?? If someone could help me id really appreciate it because I am so confused.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

Hi Sparkle1027,

I confirm:
"encuentran" = "they find."

However, the manner in which you chose to present "encuentran" to your audience does not mean "they meet up" (in my imagination) because it appears like you are failing to use the verb, encontrar, as a transitive verb. I am sorry, but you are not allowed to use encontrar as an intransitive verb.

This verb has other meanings. Perhaps it would be better if you check the dictionary yourself. Search the dictionary for encontrar and also encontrarse.

If you read the post that I wrote to Hoogeveen19, there is something in that post that might help.

And now, a word about your presentation. It can be helpful to compare apples to apples instead of comparing apples to oranges. Next time when you compare verbs with other verbs, I suggest you compare infinitive to infinitive. Instead of the third person plural conjugation of the verb, it is common to identify a Spanish verb by its infinitive form.

Let's talk about encontrar. The root of the infinitive form of this verb is encontrar. This root verb is transitive. Instead of a transitive verb, let's pretend that you might be trying to translate an intransitive English verb ("They meet up...") into Spanish. In this case, it makes sense to use the pronominal verb, encontrarse. The Duolingo exercise that everyone is discussing in this forum thread is an example of encontrarse.

By the way, pronominal verbs are not classified as transitive verbs or intransitive verbs (because they are flexible).

https://spanish.yabla.com/lesson-Those-Tricky-Reflexive-Pronouns-768

In contrast with the good explanation on the preceding web page (link in blue font), I don't recommend the explanations of pronominal verbs on the following web page. But if you just want to explore and appreciate how complicated the topic of pronominal verbs is, then you can check out the web site at the link below.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/8583007/Pronominal-Verbs-Not-for-the-faint-of-heart

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparkle1027

Im sensing a bit of hostility in your response. However, I will still thank you for the useful links and your thorough answer.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

If there was a presence of hostility that you were sensing, perhaps the hostility was coming from someone else besides me? I can't figure out where it might have been coming from.

Anyway, it is good to hear from you today.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kitchendesigner

In one of the lessons "para" was translated in sentences like this one as "IN ORDER TO". So I put "They meet at the beach in order to walk" and got it wrong! Can't "para" mean "in order to" here?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Kitchendesigner
Good answer! Your answer evidently had not been entered into the database yet. This would explain why your answer was not accepted.

Sometimes we (students) have to report an answer to Duolingo so that they can include it in the database of answers. If you didn't report it, then perhaps nobody has reported it yet.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KelliF

Why is meet up necessary? Why is They are going to meet on the beach to walk incorrect?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@KelliF
Your question has not yet been answered as elaborately as I am about to answer it. But bdbarber has already given a direct answer. Furthermore, Ruth985027 identified the phrasal verb in the exercise and also implied that the particle, up, is not necessary when she wrote the very first post at the uppermost position of this page. And as for me, I agree with both of these people.

Once again, the particle, up, is not so necessary. It merely adds an emphasis. It is not so important that the meaning of the sentence changes significantly. If Duolingo is not giving you credit for your answer without the particle, then you can report this to Duolingo. Sometimes we have to report a few missing answers to some of the exercises. And then we have to wait... and wait... :-)

https://www.dailywritingtips.com/grammar-review-1-particles-and-phrasal-verbs/

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/phrasal-verbs

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MasterYods
MasterYods
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How would 'They meet him on the beach for a walk.' be different in Spanish?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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According to this a walk (noun) is paseo, caminata, or vuelta. http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=walk

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
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It rejected "they meet on the beach to go walking". Reported 14 April 2018.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Perhaps that would be "para ir a caminar"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
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Reported again 29 April 2018.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth985027

Caminar, is the infinitive, to walk. Caminando, is the gerundio / gerund, walking, or the participle of the verb, to walk. So, I'm afraid that Duo isn't wrong this time, you are.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Leebrownst1 @Ruth985027 @elizadeux

I have an opinion. I think your final conclusion is correct, Ruth.

Below is the translation of Mister Lee Brown's English sentence.

"They meet on the beach to go walking". Ellos se encuentran en la playa para ir caminar.

Spanish infinitives can often be translated into English as infinitives (like to do) or English-gerunds (like doing). Vice versa, remember that English gerunds are often translated into Spanish as an infinitive.

While I was constructing my translation of Mister Lee Brown's English sentence, I chose to use the word, caminar, as a gerund. When I say "gerund", I mean gerund in the English language sense of the term. While I was constructing my translation, I rejected caminando because I don't want a participle. I want a noun. And I don't know how to use caminando as a Spanish noun (just like English gerunds are used as nouns in English sentences.) Do you know how Ruth? Can caminando be used in Spanish sentences just like English gerunds are used? Or did you mean gerundio exclusively? Or both? Were you also talking about English gerunds? Can you clarify, Ruth?

And Ruth, I invite you to address me as "Phillip" in this thread. Please feel free. And I extend this invitation to all my other readers including Mister Lee Brown. And I hope this post has pleased all of you. Actually, I am not done yet. Keep reading.

Though you may see the term, gerund, erroneously translated as gerundio, there is no direct Spanish equivalent to an English gerund. I will say it again: There is no such thing as a spanish gerund.

WHAT IS A GERUND? A gerund is an English verb form ending in -ing that functions in a sentence as a noun. Although both the present participle and the gerund are formed by adding -ing to a verb, the participle does the job of an adjective while the gerund does the job of a noun.

Infinitivo: The spanish infinitive is the basic, unconjugated form of a verb. This verb form, the infinitive (el infinitivo), oftentimes serves as the verb form that people point to when they call a verb by name.

The Spanish infinitive (infinitivo) is a single word with one of the following endings: -ar, -er, or -ir: hablar, comer, salir, etc.

In English, the infinitive is to + verb: to talk, to eat, to leave, etc.

https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/gerunds-in-spanish

https://www.thoughtco.com/identifying-verbals-in-english-grammar-1689699

https://www.thoughtco.com/phrasal-verb-1691624

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Airvay
Airvay
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How about using proper English instead: "They meet up on the beach for a walk"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdbarber

If you are saying that you need to have the word "up" in the sentence to be proper English, then I disagree. In some places "meet up" may be common usage, but it is by no means required. Where I live (Arkansas, USA), it is not common usage.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Airvay
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meet up or meet is not the point. The point is: You meet for a walk - not you meet to walk.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4
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maybe they are going to walk (no plans to take a walk, but just to walk a little). ´A walk´is a thing--often a thing with a planned length, beginning and end whereas ´to walk´places the emphasis on the activity. If you can meet ´to drink´(together) or meet ´for a drink´, and you can meet ´to play football´as well as meet ´for a football match´ then why would we not easily be able to use both ´to walk´and ´for a walk´.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan144464

That sentence may be more comfortable for most everyone, but the given sentence is not improper.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Airvay
I perceive a lesser issue when I examine your choice to say "...for a walk" instead of "...to walk." It is hard for me to find fault with this choice. But next time, if the spanish sentence shows you that you don't have to insert an a when you are constructing your next English translation, then I recommend that you don't. Instead, choose another English colloquialism that fits better.

2 months ago
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