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"Maintenant, le chef a le dos au mur."

Translation:Now, the chief has his back against the wall.

April 14, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter149156

Why is the following answer not accepted: "Now the boss has his back against the wall"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

By the way, this is a figurative expression meaning that the man cannot take another step back and he has to make a decision.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Java_The_Hut

"this," as in the French sentence? Because that is how I also understood the translation in English should have been.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Avoir le dos au mur" (= to have one's back to the wall) is indeed what I referred to with "this".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madhav_Malhotra

I always said, "back on the wall" instead of "back to the wall." (I'm from Canada)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Mariette

That is literally what "to have your back against the wall" means in English. "To" or "against" are both correct. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/have-your-back-to-against-the-wall


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StarlaW19

Agreed. I would also say his back against the wall as the figure of speech meaning to be in a bind or without options


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doublelingot

maintenant, le patron est dans la merde jusqu’au cou


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruyoung5

why is "boss" not accepted? why must it be"chief"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/louisemathias0

In Britain we are more likely to say "..........his back TO the wall." than " .....AGAINST the wall." It is not wrong and it shoud be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"To the wall" is accepted if the rest is correct.

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