"Une aubergine n'est pas une banane violette."

Translation:An eggplant is not a purple banana.

April 15, 2018

26 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamNdP

For interest's sake, aubergine or eggplant is also known as brinjal & all three terms are common in South African English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paco9dez

To enrich the word list: in anglophone West Africa also the word "garden egg" is well know, at least for the traditional round types. Brinjal is as far as I know the Hindi word, therefore also common in India.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_adger

In Australia it is also known as "eggfruit". Obviously the (egg)fruit grows on the (egg)plant...

This link suggests that the British called the plant (but maybe not the fruit?) "eggplant" first, and says "The Italian name of this tree-of-eggs plants is Pianta Delle Uova; the Spanish name is Planta de Huevos."

https://www.finegardening.com/article/how-eggplant-got-its-name


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morgan64010

Must one print warning labels on everythimg?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluedaffodil

An eggplant is also known as an aubergine in uk English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sp_mary

I am giving you lingots because I like the way you presented the information. (No insults to other nations) There are some people (maybe even a lot of people) who don't know what an aubergine is and they don't need to be assaulted by pent up angst because Duolingo uses the "American" word "eggplant."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marije991

You learn so much on Duo..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dashwax

Why does the adjective not follow the rule that colours derived from objects (orange etc) do not decline ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

The color adjective agreement rule has exceptions which also have exceptions: "violet, violette, violets, violettes" is one of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lulularosa

I have to give you a lingot just for making me laugh!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus895174

As the old saying goes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrebleCleff

I will be honest: I have never heard of an aubergine, and I am a full-blooded American


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaroEnrico

It's because you are a full-blooded American that you have never heard of it; eggplant is the American term for aubergine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

In AmE, it is an eggplant. In the UK, it's called an aubergine (borrowed from the French). It's not everyone's cup of tea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rimjus

They should try it as a vegetable then - I don't think it would go well in tea. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craigpeake

Today I learnt that Americans call aubergines "egg plants".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

"Eggplants" (no space).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InvertedGo

C'est vrai! Mais on peut manger tout les deux.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"On peut manger les deux" or "On peut les manger toutes les deux".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dumark53

Brits call an aubergine "an aubergine." Many Americans like "melanzana alla parmigiana"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

Does anyone actually think it is?

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