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"¿La casa tiene dormitorios modernos?"

Translation:Does the house have modern bedrooms?

3
3 months ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ljandrada

What does modern bedroom even mean?

12
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The style of the furnishings is trendy with clean lines, perhaps Scandinavian.

5
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jdunifon

I am confused by the connotations of 'dormitorio' vs 'sala' vs 'cuarto.' Does their usage vary by country or do they always refer to specific kinds of rooms?

4
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Cuarto" is generic for "room." "Sala" usually means living room, although "sala" can be used as "room." "Dormitorio" usually refers to a bedroom.

2
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephyJoyce

Sala always means living room. Dormitorio means bedroom, but in real life when I refer to a bedroom I say cuarto. Like "Él está en su cuarto" for "He's in his room."

0
Reply1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-snowplow-

Real Estate Guy: "*cough cough. Well, I wouldn't say there 21st century modern, but yes, they are in most ways very trendy." Buyer: "Hmm...so dust everywhere is a trend?"

4
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-snowplow-

um ... creo que sí

1
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rabidace03

For some reason, it seems very important for Duo Lingo that a house has modern bedroons.

1
Reply2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesJOL3

what does "modern" mean

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul862466

Still relevant to this day and age.

0
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

20th Century. I.e. Slightly dated.

0
Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-snowplow-

"In style", "trendy"

-1
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evangelinereed

I said "The house has three modern bedrooms?" and it was marked wrong. Duo Lingo stated the right answer as "The house has GOT three modern bedrooms?" Why the GOT? It sounds like more correct grammar just to say the house HAS, without the got.

0
Reply6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellenkeyne
ellenkeyne
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I agree, but I’m an American English speaker — I think “has got” is an Anglicism — and I suspect that the Spanish team simply overlooked “has” as an option. Did you use the button to report it?

0
Reply6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evangelinereed

Thanks! That makes sense! Yes, I did! :)

0
Reply6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

'got' is poor English and should not be used - but don't Americans use 'gotten', a term never used in the UK?

0
Reply1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

'Got' is very poor English and should be avoided. DL has that wrong. Your response should be accepted although it would probably be better not just to rely upon voice intonation to indicate the question

0
Reply1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mau893465

Hahahahaha

-2
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kpez16

GET YOUR CRAP TOGETHER DUOLINGO. One sentence says dormitorio is only accepted as "Dormitory" two questions later, when asked in a house as well it only accepts bedrooms?

-2
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Colette984040

Has the house modern bedrooms? - this should be accepted

-6
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Yeah, your sentence is OK, but I think Duo’s sentence is more natural. The Does... constuction is so standard in English.

2
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CzHun
CzHun
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Grammatically your sentence is not correct, even if it is used in the colloquial English sometimes; (not correctly).

You have to use the right auxuliary verb to make a question. In this case it is "does".

"Have/has" is the auxuliary verb of the present pefect tense.

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellenkeyne
ellenkeyne
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The poster you're responding to wasn't using "has" as an auxiliary, but as the main verb. "Has [someone] [some item]?" is a legitimate way to inquire about possession in English, but it's also old-fashioned and sounds stilted in American English.

3
Reply1 month ago