https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jean-Prouvaire

Help with pronunciations: does anybody have any resources?

So i'm currently doing the irish course, i've only gotten a few lessons in, but I'm already unable to wrap my head around the pronunciation. I understand the whole slender/broad rule, and I've seen the phonetic comparisons of the letters in both english approximations and IPA, but there just seems to be something literally missing. Like whole words. For example in the sentence given in the phrases skill, "Tá fáilte romhat" (you are welcome), the audio that goes along with it sounds like it is saying, "tah fahlte roat" or in the irish spelling minus the part i don't hear, "Tá fáilte rot" that's a whole three letters that are gone from the pronunciation. This isn't even the only example i've come across, nearly every other sentence seems to have random letters placed within words that are sympl not pronounced. can anybody explain why this happens to me? or direct me to some valuable resources on why this happens?

April 16, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissSpells

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/26747720 I highly recommend the Duolingo Irish course on memrise! Also forvo.com

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
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  • 1158

Can you hear the "s" in "Paris" when speaking French?

The mh in romhat has a "w" sound, and depending on how the vowels on either side of it are pronounced, you might not notice it.

For a simple guide to the basics of how letters are pronounced, and how they are affected by lenition and eclipsis, Karen Reshkin's video is a useful place to start.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIokUII7LX0

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xsofia.ice

Use forvo.com, it has basically every language’s pronounciation

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanTravers

Hi Jean-Prouvaire, https://www.focloir.ie/en/ is a great website. You can look up any Irish word and there are audio files in all three dialects. Duolingo seems to mix up the dialects without any context which is why "Fáilte romhat" probably sounds different from lesson to lesson.

There is no "correct" dialect in Irish but Connacht Irish (that audio file will be marked as 'C' on focloir.ie) seems to be used as the standard dialect when teaching.

I'm going to write a blog post on a few tricks in getting around the tricky pronunciations in Irish and I'll link it back here once I've written it.

April 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
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  • 1158

In schools in Ireland, most teachers will teach a pronunciation that is closest to the standard written form (so mná and cnoc with an "n" sound, as in Munster Irish, im with a short i, as in Ulster Irish, etc). For words like deartháir, where the spelling doesn't reflect any of the main dialects particularly well, you'll get whatever the teacher learned. Connacht isn't really the standard dialect for pronunciation, though the use of synthetic verb forms, which are significantly more frequent in Munster Irish, is usually limited to the forms that are used in Connacht Irish, but that's because they're the forms used in An Caighdeán Oifigiúil rather than because teachers are teaching Connacht Irish.

For adult learners, both in Ireland and abroad, the dialect taught will tend to reflect your teachers dialect, and the current prominence of Oideas Gael as a centre for adult learners gives Donegal Irish a bit of an edge for those learners who want to learn by immersion.

April 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john147082

Welcome to Irish. I'm still looking for a decent pronunciation guide and I been told (although I'm not convinced) that there isn't really one. My Irish dictionary is noteworthy in not having a general one (other than for each word individually!)

Stick with it though the patterns do repeat and start to become more easily memorized. Its a challenge.

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

In that exercise’s recording, romhat sounds like English “rue it” to me. A stressed omh can be pronounced somewhere between /əu/ and /oː/ in Connacht Irish, so that vowel in the recording falls within that range. (See the Wikipedia article on Irish orthography, which gives Connacht Irish pronunciations in IPA.)

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyjaMay

I’m still looking myself.

April 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brighid

French, English and many other languages have silent letters. You need to learn the sounds of the letters, and letter combinations, in Irish. For example FH is silent, BH is a V sound etc.

April 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyeEverett715

On this topic, is it necessary to pronounce words with their broad/slender phonics? Or is it something that's accentual? Here's an analogy: I can get away with not rolling my "rr"s in Spanish, but I couldn't get away with pronouncing "j" like the English j. Which situation is the broad/slender rule like? I ask because I often forget.

Anyway....to answer OP's question, I have some handy notes on Irish pronunciation that can be found right here: https://imgur.com/e09Uq9T

There's some confusing stuff in there, but there's a point where I say "As in GB" - that stands for Great Britain. I hope these notes are helpful.

April 22, 2018
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