"Le supermarché a une assez bonne charcuterie."

Translation:The supermarket has a rather good deli.

April 18, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BethBecky

Why is 'the supermarket has quite a good deli' not accepted?

April 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame

Don't know, because it gave me that as a correct answer when I put 'a quite good deli'

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_scott

Quite good means really good, or very. Whereas assez bonne means pretty good, rather good, not bad.

March 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulSadler3

I really think "The supermarket has quite a good charcuterie" should be accepted. It's a fairly commonly used word in English, at least in England anyway. I don't think it really needs to be translated (although deli would be the obvious translation I agree)

November 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PihlaKettunen

Why is "The supermarket has a rather good deli meat" wrong?

August 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sotnosen93

According to Wordreference charcuterie can translate to cooked/cold meats, which I think is close enough to merit reporting. I welcome any native speaker to tell me if I'm wrong though. Also note that cold cuts/deli meats as in a collection of meats (I think as in a dish?) is assiette de charcuterie.

http://www.wordreference.com/fren/charcuterie

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Wmconlon

"The supermarket has a fairly good delicatessen." was not accepted.

April 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BaiShann

fwiw: Canadian usage never includes the word 'supermarket'. It is 'grocery store' and I KEEP FORGETTING, :(

July 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SnarfSnarf123

The supermarket has rather a good deli is more natural English and should be accepted. Originally I wrote the suggested answer as a literal translation but changed it as it didn't sound right to me as an English speaker.

April 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Geoffrey878583

I too said "a quite good deli". Should be accepted.

April 25, 2019
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