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"I swim in the pool."

Translation:Yo nado en la piscina.

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5 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ajohnsonmd
Ajohnsonmd
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odd - I learned "piscina" for pool.

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Swimming pool is piscina. Alberca is normally a pond for animals or water storage for farming.

However, in Mexico is used for swimming pool.

http://buscon.rae.es/drae/srv/search?id=gGzvrXk6UDXX2AJDrpK5

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ajohnsonmd
Ajohnsonmd
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thanks! - so for my swim team practice it truly would be "piscina" but for my uncle who learned to swim (while growing up on a farm) - he learned with the other boys in the "alberca" and the girls never learned to swim. ;)

I wish we had an option to specify which region - I was taught Spanish (for Spain) and the vosotros verb form, spent my 10 day trip in Spain (not Mexico) and my parents (before I was born) lived in Valledolid (sp?) which had a regional pronounciation/sound that gave me trouble with my formal teachers. :)

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Nice! I have never properly "been" in Valladolid, but I've gone through many times. I was at some point of the 90s, some days in the house of some friends of my parents in Iscar, which is not Valladolid city, but still in the region... equal distant from Tordesillas than Valladolid, I'd say.

They certainly had a thick accent there. There is no much immigration, so the language really does not get mixed on those places. Really hot was it! and my first and only time in a bull fight too

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ajohnsonmd
Ajohnsonmd
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That makes sense. My mom always seemed confused that there was any other way to speak Spanish. I know she knew intellectually but that accent/regional difference was cemented into her speaking. It's pretty cool to know why. My parents lived there (and Pinerolo, Italy) in the 60's, so it had a double-whammy so to speak on their lives - as it meant they missed the whole "60's cultural revolution" in the U.S. I was the recipient of the benefits and negatives. :)

Given that they lived in Europe - I got wonderful things like my mom making Paella for Scouts in 1st grade and flan all the time - my dad's (and my favorite). ( I do think with my stomach. ) Of course, I associate New Year's with herring, cheese, olives and crackers - I'm 1/8th swedish and somehow, in my family food = identity. Maybe b/c my parents lived through the depression when food was scarse? My Christmas stocking always had an orange in it.

But then I had culture shock at my friend's houses - dinner at 5 was the hardest - and my parent's acted like everyone else's grandparent's in regards to popular culture: my dad didn't even like Elvis - My mom -she likes Elvis but she barely even is okay with The Beatles.

I've been lucky enough to visit Spain (for 10 days) but never near Valladolid. You are very lucky. Where do you live? Did you watch or participate in the bull fight?

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Reply5 years ago