"I forgot to take my dog out, so it is angry."

Translation:我忘记了带我的狗出去,所以它很生气。

April 19, 2018

31 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nashz5293

Is the 很 really necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

It's not absolutely necessary in this sentence, but it's commonly used in run-of-the-mill statements like this and you should get used to including it. But native Chinese speakers seem to use it simply to make the sentence sound "better", which means that "很" doesn't really add a lot of emphasis.

Below are links to a couple of resources that cover the matter on a basic level (and for what it's worth, seem to suggest that "很" is necessary if not replaced with something else, which is a good guideline for learners, even if not strictly accurate).


As for "的", which has come up a couple of times below, I had a conversation about it on another page, and asked some native Chinese speakers.

I thought "的" could be dropped in reference to a pet, but it turns out that while it's possible, it's not so common, and the several native speakers I polled all said they would always use "的".

That said, I have found, for example, the expressions "我狗狗" and "我猫" online, but not in great numbers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeon8257

"Mom" implies "my mom" but "dog" doesn't. Hence the "de" to establish possession.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

That could be a helpful mnemonic in some cases, but it's not quite equivalent, so it could also be somewhat misleading.

For one thing, Chinese speakers can say any of "妈妈" ("Mom"), "我妈妈" ("my mom"), or "我的妈妈" ("my mom"), and the middle one doesn't really have a directly analogous form in English. (Some British English speakers do say "me mum", but it seems that "me" in this case is really nothing more than an older or dialectical pronunciation of "my".)

For another, using "Mom" without the possessive to imply "my mom" seems a lot less ubiquitous in English than dropping "的" for relatives in Chinese, and I'm also not aware of native English speakers saying things like "sister", "brother", or "cousin" without the possessive, though in Chinese the "的" can be dropped for all of these.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HowieChang2

No. But you need 了 at the end if you omit the 很


[deactivated user]

    Can you explain why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArielDabalsa

    Is 我忘記了帶我的狗出去 natural? If not, what would sound more natural?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseKelig

    It's not natural at all. 我忘記帶我的狗出去了 is what you should say.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JO-ANNPSILOCYBIN

    Yeah, the "了" in this sentence seems a bit out of place and "我忘记带我的狗出去" sounds more natural.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.N.J.A.

    我忘了带我的狗出门,所以它很生气 should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RojGreenlife

    This sentence does not have "very" but without it the answer is wrong, why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShiMorui

    Is the 的 always required? Seems like Duolingo is docking me hearts over an optional possessive.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    The several native Chinese speakers I've polled would all use "的" in relation to a pet, but see my longer comment about this, which I've now reproduced above to make it more noticeable.


    [deactivated user]

      不过帮它按摩一下就行了


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lnstinct

      Would 因为我忘记了带我的狗出去,所以它很生气 be correct?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaine1950

      is this acceptable...我 忘 记带我的狗出去了,所以它很生气


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

      It should be, but Duo will reject your Chinese sentence if you put spaces in it, so if you entered it as it is in your comment, it would have been marked wrong regardless.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaine1950

      Which I did. Interesting, thank you.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rimoll

      Why is the 了 needed at all?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

      Basically it indicates that the forgetting is something that happened in the past.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahDeLaF

      Why is this wrong without 很?生气 can't exist without it? Everyone is either not angry or extra? If the adjective is there by itself without an intensifier...what the h3ll?!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.Clark4

      My real argument with this whole website is that the English is often awkward. Somebody else should weight in about the Chinese. "because" would be used instead of "so. I would say "my dog's really mad because I forgot to take him out."


      [deactivated user]

        The problem is that "because" and "so" cannot replace each other in English, as you would have to change the order of the sentence. The same holds for "yin wei" and "suo yi" in Chinese - although there you could use both in one sentence, which would be wrong in English.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cat_in_black

        better use 牠 instead of 它 as a pronoun of an animal.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

        The former is used with traditional characters but not with simplified, as far as I know.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim848820

        This an interesting point (although PeaceJoy Pancakes points out that you cannot make this distinction in simplified characters). I have a question, in English people increasingly personify their pets and even wild animals and would mostly use "him" or "her" to refer to animals they know or even, eg a fox visiting the garden. Is this happening in China? When people write (eg in WeChat) about their pet poodles which character would they use, in either simplified or traditional characters?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimberlyChan2424

        You DON'T need to use 的。


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

        I had this conversation on another page, and asked some native Chinese speakers.

        I thought "的" could be dropped in reference to a pet, but it turns out that while it's possible, it's not so common, and the several native speakers I polled said they would always use "的".

        That said, I have found, for example, the expressions "我狗狗" and "我猫" online, but not in great numbers.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wrickmeister

        Means the same without 出去。


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

        I don't see it. It seems to me that without "出去" you get something more like "I forgot to bring my dog", not "I forgot to take my dog out".

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