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  5. "Les petits garçons se sont t…

"Les petits garçons se sont tus depuis une heure."

Translation:The little boys have kept quiet for an hour.

April 19, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robymcandrew

As a father and Scout leader I'd be wondering what they were up to


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neoscribe

How would I say "the little boys have kept quiet since one o'clock?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToWiK

What is the infinitive of tus?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertWhea3

Taire or se taire- to keep quiet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiladWaleed

can i use "pendant" here instead of "depuis" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marmstrong77

The little boys have stayed quiet for an hour - should that be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yQ3q
  • 1763

Isn't it strange to use the passé composé with depuis? Normally we are told to use the present tense in French even though we use the present perfect in English. Is there a distinction in meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CommeuneTexane

It depends upon how you look at the sentence. If "have kept quiet" is considered an "event" that happened at a fixed point in time in the past → passé composé. If the "have kept quiet" is a process or a continued state of being → present.

It is very common to use the present tense in French with depuis, whereas in English you'd use the present perfect. However, this is a sentence where either present or passé composé will work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce878691

I frequently confuse se taire and tuer, especially given that the past tense of se taire includes "tu", which of course resembles tuer. I guess if one committed suicide, it would be se tuer, so the similarity would be even greater.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tantwo

Shouldn't "depuis une heure" mean "since one o'clock" and "pendant une heure" mean "for an hour"?

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