"Ella hace un trabajo difícil."

Translation:She does a difficult job.

7 months ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisScafe
ChrisScafe
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I think, "She has a difficult job" would be a better translation. As a native English speaker I think it would be unusual for someone to say "She does a difficult job."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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How about "She does difficult work"? Would that be better?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nancy932168

I thought it said, She makes a job hard! Instead of she DOES a hard job.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
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That would have been "Ella hace difícil un trabajo".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruzah

after reading the comment above I was wondering how would one say such a sentence. Thank you!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kitchendesigner

But interestingly, if you type in "she makes a job difficult" into SpanishDict translation it comes up "ella hace un trabajo dificil" for all three translations.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Those automatic translators are not reliable, especially for more uncommon sentences.

Instead, you should use translation databases, even though they require a bit of puzzle work.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kitchendesigner

Thank you for posting this. You'd have to take the time to study all the examples. Unfortunately, I think a lot of us lazy humans are looking for a fast answer. Too bad Duo doesn't have a brief info section for phrases where literal translation doesn't work.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puccini2018

No , DL makes our work hard !

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DetlefSchu5

Excact

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GateAN
GateAN
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I'd contend "she has a difficult job" ought to be an acceptable alternative bto the suggested (DL) response of " she does a difficult job". Anyone care to comment?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
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It rejected "she is doing a difficult job" insisting on the simple past. Reported 8 July 2018.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

Ditto. Glad you reported it. We'll probably get it accepted in about a month.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattRTS
MattRTS
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I don't know, I kind of agree with Puccini. This is awkward to me.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/11Mars1943

So trabajo cannot be translated as work and is counted as a faulty sentence ? Bizarre!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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If you wrote “do a difficult work,” then reading this thread will clarify why that response is not accepted. If you’re a native English speaker and that phrase truly sounds natural to you, you can make your case for it.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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The whole thing, using do, sounds weird to me native AE speaker. I'd say 'has a difficult job.' But i know that wouldn't be accepted. I used work, because earlier job was rejected for work. I don't like either with do.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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You wouldn't even say "She does difficult work"? I can see finding "She does a difficult job" unnatural (although I personally do not), but "She does difficult work" I would have thought would be well within the range of normal across all varieties of English.

"earlier job was rejected for work"? Do you mean rejected as a translation of trabajo? Either "work" or "job" can be valid translations, and in many instances both could work, but one must be attentive to the context of the sentence.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/11Mars1943

According to DL" work" is not an accepted translation for trabajo! Strange!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert116627

Why not say, ella tiene...?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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That's not what the sentence wants to say. It's not her job that is difficult, but the task she's currently doing.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe830172

Why not "she makes a job diffucult" ?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Ella hace difícil un trabajo" or "Ella dificulta un trabajo".

You need to remember that you can't make a noun-adjective combination in Spanish without having them connect. If you want to say "Does your friend speak English?" and you translate with "¿Habla tu amigo español?", you're suddenly at "Does your English friend speak?"

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulorio1
paulorio1
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I found all these examples in the wiktionary:

. Holding a brick over your head is hard work. It takes a lot of work to write a dictionary.

. We know what we must do. Let's go to work.

. There's lots of work waiting for me at the office.

. We don't have much time. Let's get to work, piling up those sandbags.

I would say, trabajo meaning employment (Ella toene un trabajo difícil):

She has a difficult job.

I would say, trabajo meaning task: (Ella hace un trabajo difícil)

She does a difficult work or she is doing a difficult work.

I do not understand why DL does not accept work.

But I am not native neither in English nor in Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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In all these examples, "work" is used without any article. It should be the same in this sentence: "She does difficult work".

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harold18340

Why not just say, "Ella tiene un trabajo dificil"? Use of "hacer" in this context can obviously lead to confusion.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It isn't confusing to Spanish speakers. Tener is about the job she has. Hacer is about the work she's currently doing.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoyalGhost1

You guys are arguing over one question

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puccini2018

You don't DO a difficult JOB, you DO a difficult WORK ! I can understand that the English translator, indeed HAS A DIFFICULT JOB

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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Maybe in the US (I don't know), but in the UK, you certainly "do a difficult job" and don't "do a difficult work". (You might, however, "do difficult work".)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Seems the same in the US to me.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaerie

Guessing that was a typo on Puccini's part.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruzah

Have you never heard the command "Do your job!!!!!!? Now I can't find anything wrong with adding a modifier - difficult- in there.

3 months ago
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