"L'orange n'est pas sucrée cette fois."

Translation:The orange is not sweet this time.

April 21, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AronTrinidad

Does « sucrée » agree with the subject? Would it be lawful if I say « Le gâteau est sucré »?

April 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/peterviuz

Yes, that's right.

April 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TimLuby

Is this an expression in France, or is this supposed to be taken literally? If it is, I like it. If not, well, i'll start using it anyway!

July 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/peterviuz

It's not an expression. It's just talking about an orange.

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jean838603

Is there a reason why "the orange is not sweet that time" is not correct (instead of The orange is not sweet this time) ? I do not see a so much difference between this and that.

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/thomasgionet

Saying "that time" would mean that the orange was tasted in the past, not the present. The sentence in English would be "the orange was not sweet that time". "This time" indicates the orange is being tasted now in the present.

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JonasTranc1

Does sucré means sweet in a general sense or does it literally mean "sugar was added"? In Dutch we have "gesuikerd", which means that sugar was added, but also the word "zoet" which means something is naturally sweet.

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jean838603

In French, "sucré" is used for both senses. "Le fruit est sucré" (naturally sweet) or "Le café est sucré" (sugar has been added).

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JonasTranc1

Thanks!

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/InvertedGo

So how do you keep them apart? If say someone makes a fruit pie that includes orangea and is asked why it tastes better this time. How would you say "the oranges were not sweetened this time" vs "the oranges were not sweet this time"?

May 13, 2019
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