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"Mkasi mbovu"

Translation:The broken pair of scissors

April 21, 2018

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babu-G

In British English we usually use the name "scissors" rather than "pair of scissors"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

I agree. Reported 9 May 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZackReagin

In American English "scissors" is far more common than "pair of scissors" as well, though both are used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frank856835

broken scissors should be acceptable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phb2013

"Broken scissors" was accepted on Jan. 2, 2019.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wmmunting

broken scissors still not accepted??????????????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catriona28475

Don't hold your breath! They may not get round to fixing it for months. They are volunteers and hardly any students are paying for the course (how many times have you seen "PLUS" after someone's name?) so we can't really complain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardThor2

They shouldn't be volunteers. They should be paid. Isn't that one reason we're putting up all these ads?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon725845

Why do everyone here suggest that broken scissors should be accepted?! In my opinion only functioning scissors schould be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MBG266009

My complaint is that "bovu" means rotten, spoiled, or useless. If something is broken, it usually IS useless, but "useless" does not mean "broken". My language helper could not think of a Swahili adjective that specifically means "broken", only ones that mean "bad" and other more general adjectives like that, and like useless, "bovu". To say broken, she could only think of the verb, and say, "It has been broken" (vimevunjika)

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