1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: French
  4. >
  5. "Elle affirme que oui."

"Elle affirme que oui."

Translation:She affirms so.

April 22, 2018

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Summerstor5

I've never heard "She affirms so" in English.

Even "She affirms" or "She affirms, yes" would be strange.

We generally say, "She confirms" to repeat an intention to do something or agree to something.

To affirm usually means "to announce agreement with a belief or statement". So, "She affirms her believe in" or "She affirms she will do sth" would be more normal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biscuitamericain

or ''she affirms it'' ... whatever ''it'' is. I think ''attests to it'' should work, too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Summerstor5

These aren't words we use often and common use of them can change. It's difficult in one language and worse in two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom419655

It does accept "She says so." 18 Dec 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taramitzy

I've never EVER heard an English person say that!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roody-Roo

Now you have heard it!


[deactivated user]

    But only as said by a robot!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XgwJ4UVx

    An English translation that has never been spoken or written. It looks as if the French means "she asserts (or says) yes."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pleurerai

    'She affirms' and 'She affirms so' have no real difference meaning wise. I suppose 'so' is 'que oui' together; but honestly, I understood it too literally ('what yes'). Duo should accept both imo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wmconlon

    I tried both 'She affirms it' and 'She affirms it is so' without success. The approved translation is awkward, but could make sense in response to a question. Absent context, it is difficult to gain much from this exercise.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

    "She affirms so" is not proper English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XagZ019S

    Mind you, "She so affirms" is proper English - but it is both technical - as in Court of Law, and archaic. I agree that it's unusual and we would normally say, "confirms", but in the US forces, people usually say " affirmative" instead of "yes" as a way of making the message clear. Remember that Duo uses US "English" as its default setting.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathryn343697

    I am English and I would never say 'She affirms so' and I have never heard any other native English speaker say this either. 'She confirms that she...….' is customary usage.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Algenon

    Yup - English speakers don't say this. Reported, for what it's worth.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudiaWeber15

    "She affirms that yes" accepted 02/06/20

    Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.
    Get started