"Elespañolesunidiomainteresante."

Translation:Spanish is an interesting language.

8 months ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheEmood
TheEmood
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Why is it "un" and not "una"?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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"Idioma" is one of several masculine words ending in "-ma": tema, problema, programa, drama, clima, etc.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mstanding

Thanks for the "-ma" tip!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EseEmeErre
EseEmeErre
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This rule is true for words of Greek origin ending with "-ma." However, words that are not of Greek origin are typically female (e.g. the llama / la llama, the dame / la dama).

The reason for this is that in Greek these words were originally neuter, and they remained neuter when they were absorbed into Latin. However, as Spanish diverged from Latin, those neuter words became masculine.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brendan45679

Idioma vs. langua, whats the difference? Unfortunately this is something duo doesn't do so well, give any context for which words are appropriate in what situations

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

I believe the difference matches the two English words they most often directly translate to: 'idoma' = 'language' and 'langua' = 'tongue'. In English the word 'tongue' can be used in place of 'language' in certain contexts. Likewise in Spanish.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andy178665

According to spanishdict.com lengua=tongue or language and lenguaje=language.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andy178665

I don't mean to imply that "idioma" doesn't mean "language".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Briefly, idioma is used when talking about a certain language, like the language of a country or of a specific group of people. Spanish language, the language of the court, etc.

Lengua/lenguaje is used when talking about how someone expresses themselves, or when talking about speech itself. Foul language, colloquial language, the likes.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Thanks RyagonIV! Great explanation.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerJames5
RogerJames5
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ALL languages are interesting! I wish I had more lives to learn/learn about them! An extra language is never a burden. Do you hear me, Brits?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.moqaddem

the language word is not appear in the choices

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF
0KyfnlOF
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Idioma (el) is the word for language

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THOMASPESC2

idiom means language in English (technically) , does idioma mean something different than lengua

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Idiom" does not precisely mean "language".

Idioma is slightly different from lengua, but colloquially they get interchanged quite a bit. Idioma refers to the language of a particular people or country: "El español es el idioma de muchos países de América del Sur." Lengua is a bit broader, referring to that systematic communication form in general: "Actualmente estoy aprendiendo cuatro lenguas." I would use lenguas in the above sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THOMASPESC2

Sounds like translating the phrase as Spanish is an interesting idiom is a better one than what Duo likes

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ESK_22

Nos sabemos

2 weeks ago
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