"Are you staying here for many days?"

Translation:¿Te quedas aquí por muchos días?

7 months ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MasterYods
MasterYods
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Having plans 'for the summer' is para, but staying 'for many days' is por. Now I'm lost. I though 'para' meant 'for' more in terms of 'in order to' ???

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Use 'para' for Deadlines, Destinations, Goals, and Recipients.

Use 'por' for Communication, Duration, Exchanges, Motivation, and Travel.

In this case it is a duration.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belle_wood
belle_wood
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Oh god, thanks for that.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

De nada. Another thing that can help is to picture 'para' as arrow with a destination or ending... hence Deadlines, goals, etc... In contrast you can picture 'por' as an X or a squiggly line so in deals with exchanges (where both parties get something) or motion in general (without a specific end or goal).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angela872862

Thank you so much. Just come across your invaluable post. It is now copied into my work book for reference.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisisalive

Could you say, "Estas quedando aqui..."?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TinaJCassese

Didn't the tips say that we could use the infinitive after the subject and add the reflexive at the end. I've been trying this but it doesn't seem to be correct

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonC1983

This would be the case if the infinitive in English also applied. Por ejemplo: ¿Vas a quedarte? - Are you going to stay? or ¿Va a quedarse usted? - Are you going to stay? (formal).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calebjonker

Shouldn't '¿Quedarse aquí por muchos días?' work?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonC1983

Quedarse is the infinitive that means 'to stay' or 'to remain'. Your sentence has no subject, and it would translate as 'to stay here for many days?', but no one would know who or what is staying/remaining. Also, quedarse is a reflexive verb, which means it needs a reflexive pronoun to go with it, e.g. me quedo, te quedas, se queda, nos quedamos etc.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cynthia562249

why isn't it equally correct to say Usted queda instead of te quedas?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonC1983

to stay in the infinitive is quedarse, which is reflexive so you need the reflexive pronoun for usted (se), so se queda usted should be accepted. Also usted quedarse should be accepted.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dlspeer643

Is there anything grammatically wrong with saying it this way?

¿Estás quedarte aquí por muchos días?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

I don't think that is exactly correct. If you use 'estar' you would also have to use the participle form of 'quedarse' as well. So I believe it would be either of these two options:

Te estás quedando aquí por muchos días?

Estás quedandote aquí por muchos días?

I would love a second opinion on this though.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonC1983

I agree with Michael.

quedarte, I think, would make more sense in a sentence like ¿Vas a quedarte aquí por muchos días?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

I had thought of that but that be more 'Are you going to...'? Admittedly a similar meaning but slightly different sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonC1983

Yes, you are correct, I was merely providing a sentence in which quedarte would belong, not providing a translation for the sentence in question.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dlspeer643

Thank you very much

1 month ago
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