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  5. "I would like that cake."

"I would like that cake."

Translation:Querría ese pastel.

April 23, 2018

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmdadAhmed

What is the difference between querría & quisiera


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Quisiera sounds a bit more polite, and it seems to be used more commonly throughout the world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zai5qOEg

A bit more polite is (almost) always good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jack872103

As few Americans (me in particular) can properly pronounce querria, it seems quisiera is the better option.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Padmani2

So someone can correct me if I'm wrong, because I'm not a native speaker, but I feel like if someone were saying, "Querría ese pastel...pero yo estoy demasiado gordo" (I would like/want that cake...but I'm too fat), then perhaps this use of the conditional tense would be correct? Because, you're not politely asking someone to get the cake, but you're just expressing a condition to wanting the cake?

BUT I've also read that it is appropriate to use the conditional to soften requests and to make them sound more polite. For example, you can make this sentence a polite request by saying, "Me gustaría ese pastel, por favor" (I would like that cake, please), and this form of gustar is in the conditional tense. However, when using querer to make a polite request, it is just more common to use the imperfect subjunctive and say "quisiera" in place of "querría." I'm not sure why, but it just seems to be one of those things in Spanish that developed over time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustafaKor276041

Quiero > Querría > Quisiera (in order of politeness) are all different ways of asking something from someone, especially when ordering something in restaurants, bars, cafe shops etc.. There might be other usages of these words but it is not a matter of this topic. In this example you are most probably in a patisserie and ordering "that cake" on the shop window.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momo_the_Avenger

Querría = I would want / Quisiera = I would like


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProfesorAntonnio

Nadie dice "querría", suena arcaico.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElderGrowc

¿Qué dicen hoy en día?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenHigh

Me gustaría or quisiera, depending on the region and occasion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belle_wood

We learned 'quisiera' for 'I would like' a little while ago--why isn't it accepted now?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It should be. Please report it if it's not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruth985027

Quisiera, is what you would use in Spain, if you were being very polite. Querría, translates as I would want... I think it's wrong to use this form, because it's conditional. Maybe it's antiquated form used wherever the Duo developer comes from...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanJ.Polasky

In that case, how would YOU express the idea presented here; i.e., 'I would like (to have) that cake'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlofSanner

She already suggested Quisiera instead of Querría. The rest of the sentence could stay the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanJ.Polasky

How about; 'Deseo tener ese pastel', or 'Me gustaria ese pastel' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rob.s.germ

Me gustaría ese pasatel? How about that? It's what I'm used to hearing in Panama and Costa Rica.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Sure, if that phrasing is used there, it's fine. You just shouldn't put that extra 'a' into pastel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustafaKor276041

They are not the same thing. "Me gustaria" means you like it. It does not necessarily mean you want to eat the cake right then. Whereas "querria (or quisiera) is used when you ask it from someone (probably from a waiter in a restaurant) in order to eat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haengcha

"Yo querria ese pastel" was marked wrong and I can't understand why. I used "Yo" because I felt "querria" doesn't differentiate the subject sufficiently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanJ.Polasky

You are precisely correct. This must be reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joy152507

There's an accent on "querría" - since verbs can actually mean different things depending on the accents, that might be why they considered it incorrect rather than just a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna_Losey

This should be quisiera


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StiDay03

Quisiera is now accepted - 08-01-2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trisha708624

Quisiera not accepted???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneHarvey6

In the past there was always a careful delineation between ´querer¨and ¨gustar¨.My answers that substituted ¨like¨for ¨want¨were always marked incorrect, even though the meaning was the same. Why not keep the gustar construction? That would be more consistent, less confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julie630717

why not "me gustaria...."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Me gustaría" would be okay here as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenHigh

me gustaría ese pastel
is accepted May 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yara.Daik

Quisiera not accepted (april 2020)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthVader549214

It just accepted "quisiera" for me. Perhaps you made a different error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stmoebius

So I found this article: https://www.espanolavanzado.com/gramatica-avanzada/28-uso-de-palabras/593-quisiera-queria-querria Should "quería" (the imperfect) also be accepted here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanshikabisht

Duolingo didn't teach querría verb and tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrayNathan

So now even "cake" is masculine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexandra709588

Queria is only a typo, not the wrong word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlofSanner

Querría and Quería ARE different words (same stem, but different grammatically), even though it is easy to misspell them...

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