"Promiňte, knedlíky došly."

Translation:I am sorry, we are out of dumplings.

April 23, 2018

13 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jen672827

I also couldn’t tell if “Excuse me” or “I am sorry” was appropriate. “Excuse me” I interpret as customers telling their waiter that their table has run out dumplings (but that only makes sense if these are typically something that gets replenished during your meal, like bread(rolls) perhaps - I suspect not though, i.e. whatever comes with your dish is what you get?). “I am sorry” I interpret as the waiter telling customers they can’t order any dishes with dumplings because the restaurant has run out of them.

Given the above, should both be acceptable, or just “I am sorry”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Very nice explanation! I will add alternatives using "excuse me," if the Czech natives on the team feel it is appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I see, it did not occur to me. Yes, that would be possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LetitiateT

Oh, good explanation! Only pay attention to word order. The waiter said: "(I'm sorry) Promiňte, knedlíky došli (objednejte si něco jiného / you can order something else)." But I said to waiter: "(excuse me) Promiňte, došli (nám) knedlíky. (Could you bring us more dumplings?)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shathu_Entayla

"Excuse me, we ran out of dumplings" should be accepted, should't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Actually, after reading it again, are you sure "Excuse me" is really used in this context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shathu_Entayla

I'm not really sure... Ya made me wonder... xD. I'm not native English xD.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Yes, I think it should.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMills574753

Is "Dumplings are off" (off the menu, not gone bad) a better translation? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

I (native AmE) think došly is more like they've "run out" than that they've "been taken off the menu." But I could be wrong. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

Yes, that's right, it means they've run out of dumplings.

But perhaps they say "off" for that in Ireland?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Maybe. To my AmE ear, "Dumplings are off" sounds like they've gone bad, as DavidMills574753 mentioned in his post. I'd actually expect "the dumplings" in that case, but I suppose harried wait staff could drop "the" in the interest of speedier service. But, truthfully, it's not something I'd really expect to hear very often.

Learn Czech in just 5 minutes a day. For free.