Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025

"It is not a lemon, it is an orange."

angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

The question read "Write this in Spanish: It is not a lemon, it is an orange." I typed "no es una lima, es una naranja" and I got it wrong. I reported it. The expected answer is "no es un limón, es una naranja".

Moreover, on a subsequent question, the lesson asked for a translation from Spanish to English. Same problem. They wanted limón=lemon, which is incorrect. I have a serious problem with this.

I clicked on DISCUSS but the discussion was very old and centered on a few pedantic elements regarding the fact that two independent clauses were not separated by a semicolon (fair enough) and on other minor digressions regarding the gender of nouns, so I decided not to post there only to have my concerns ignored, lost in the noise. Thus the new thread.

Certainly in Latin America, Limón is the round, green one (which we call lime) and lima is the ovoid-shaped yellow one (which we call lemon). Maybe in Spain it's different? Either way, this needs to be corrected. What we (in the US) call a lemon, the Mexicans call lima, and what we call a lime, the Mexicans call limón.

5 months ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4

It is not incorrect, but there are regional differences. In many parts of the world, lemon = limón.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=lemon

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8
  • 722

I suggest reporting this omission whenever you encounter it.

For what it's worth, a Google Image Search for "lima fruta" (because just "lima" shows me pictures of the city):

Imgur

And a Google Image Search for "limón":

Imgur

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

haha. I did the same thing and also noticed that a google search for lima shows the city. I've reported the omission. thanks.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merkavar

Wait, your saying in Latin America a lemon=Lima and lime=limon?

I thought lemon=limon (yellow) and lime would be Lima (green)? Just going of the spelling.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merkavar

I just did a quick google translate and lemon=limon

But under that there were discussions about regional differences.

Some areas not having a word for lime, others calling the green lemons etc

Wierd and interesting that something seemingly as simple as a lemon/lime seems to create discussions.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4

Yes, I noticed that it's completely opposite in Mexico. Limón = green fruit called a lime in English.

Here is an entire story on this: https://www.pri.org/stories/2015-12-02/why-asking-lime-isnt-so-easy-spanish-speaking-countries

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

Interesting article, but even there the writer shows implicit bias toward translating lime as lima and lemon as limón. I'm not asking for standardization; my complaint is very duolingo-specific. They should accept either as a reasonable translation in such cases. (Like they accept alternative spellings of English words, e.g., defense/defence)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmbka
gmbka
  • 21
  • 16
  • 12
  • 11
  • 20

In Mexico they use limon verde for lime.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

more often, just "limón." I'm absolutely certain of this. I've spent a fairly large part of my life in Mexico. I've visited 22 of the mexican states. Sometimes for months on end. I was just in Mexico for two weeks in January and I'll be there again in May. I go through quite a bit of limes myself, and I've never been in a bar in which the bartender asked "limon verde?" except close to California, where they sometimes distinguish between "limon verde" and "Limon amarillo"

I've been in plenty of bars in Guatemala, El Salvador, Peru, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Honduras as well. The all call the little green one "limón"

Con limón, señor?

claro que sí, gracias.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Not exactly. "Limón" can be "lime" (Mexico, Peru, etc.) or "lemon" (Chile, Argentina, Spain, etc.) and "lima" can be either "sour lime" or "sweet lime", I suppose "limas" never are "lemons". Anyway, "lima" should be accepted.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4

Just wait until he finds out about tortillas in Spain. ;-)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merkavar

Sounds like duolingo should accept both.

They don’t seem to be teaching European spanish or north or South American spanish, more of a conglomeration if all spanish.

So it seems lemon = Lima and limon should be accepted as different countries seem to use both.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Yes, but "lemon" is always "limón", never "lima". In the other hand, "lime" can be "lima," "limón" or "lima xxxxx" or "limón xxxxx".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merkavar

Going off the comments and a quick google it sounds like limon and lima mean different things in different countries, that you can’t say lemon is always limon.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

I didn't say that. I said a a lemon never is called lima. It is called "limón" or "limón + something".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8
  • 722

Incorrect, as it turns out. Do a Google search for "lima fruta" and see what images you get.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

No. Enter the pages, you will see those images are either "random citrus I got for my blog", posts about "¿lima o limón?" or links to related articles, namely "limón". And maybe some of them are Citrus limetta, called in English "mousambi", "sweet lime" or "sweet lemon", in Spanish, "limón criollo" (C R), "lima dulce" (Sp.).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Victor_Donjuan

I don't even get the complaint. Limón = lemon, regardless of whether you understand the green one or the yellow one.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaius_Plinius

In English those have two completely different names and are considered completely different fruits. The green one is a lime, and the yellow one is a lemon.

In Spanish, it's complex and varies a lot by region. (Where you are from, do you only use limón?)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

I take your point. There are many regional variations. I'm not going to argue with that.

At the moment I'm from Pennsylvania, but that's besides the point. This is something I noticed years ago. I noticed that a number of anglophones have the impression that Lima=lime and Limon=lemon. Seems reasonable enough. the only problem is that it's incorrect. That said, I recognize that there are regional variations, and there are citrus fruits unknown in some parts, especially to us in northern climates (I've seen quite a few really weird citrus fruits in Asia that I have no names for in English, for example.)

I'm sticking to my orginal point: The duolingo translators are confused. They seem to have it backward. (At least in the question to which I referred in my original post. As I said, in a subsequent lesson, they seem to have corrected themselves. Now, let's see if they'll correct the other one as well.)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaius_Plinius

My comment was for Victor whom I believe to be a native Spanish speaker from a place where lima is not used, which I would guess would be the reason he (if I may assume) didn't understand your OP.

I don't disagree with anything you are saying, Angus. The confusion is the result of teaching a regionless Spanish. Duolingo just throws a bunch of words out there without giving us any idea what to use where. This is a good case where that doesn't quite work (so is the inclusion of coger, which I have complained about).

But to be fair, these things usually work themselves out pretty quickly. When I was in Mexico (and when I've chatted with my Mexican friends here in the States), I learned melocotón=durazno, remolacha=betabel, buitre=zopilote, and I grew to appreciate the richness of Mexican Spanish as a bonus.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

okay, thanks. I've notice the durazno or melocotón labels as well, especially on drink cans. As I recall, Jumex uses durazno and Goya uses melocotón. Or maybe I have that backward.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

A follow-up: In a subsequent lesson in "food" I got "Write this in English: El limón, la naranja."

I cringed and typed "the lime, the orange" (thinking it would be counted incorrect) but it was counted as correct. Apparently someone has bitched about this before.

I'm doing food just to go back through it and get all the level 2 up to level 3. Yes, it's boring to type "the boy eats an orange" and "the girl does not like fish" 900 times, but that's the way it is. Anyway, I thought it was noteworthy that this time the algorithm does seem to recognize that limon (in Spanish) means lime (in English). Weird.

Merkavar, in some parts of the hispanic world, the "lemon" is not known, or at least it is not indigenous. That is, the yellow, ovoid-shaped citrus fruit doesn't really have a name familiar to the locals. In those parts, I've noticed that they have the terms limon verde and limon amarillo among those bartenders who have had the need to come up with names for them. But that's not really my complaint here. My complaint is that the interpreters on duolingo seem to have the idea that lima=lime and limón=lemon. It's backward. (Well, I used to think that in my original post. As I said, on a subsequent lesson, it seems that they have corrected themselves.)

The other question needs to be corrected as well. Not for my edification, but for those who come after (and so that we don't have to type incorrect answers just to finish a lesson in order to advance!)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

okay, thanks.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Giovanni0604

I believe it is regional. In some parts of the predominantly Spanish-speaking world, different words pass while others are left for the remaining countries to pick up and add to their spoken cultural preferences. I've come across lots of these types of issues on Duolingo. As one user put it, Duolingo teaches Spanish - not dialects. I understand your concern. Perhaps Duolingo needs a few courses that are heavily biased towards specific regions; however, the program also needs to incorporate in the fact that limón does not always mean lime. Regards, Giovanni (btw, I don't speak Spanish so don't trust me completely) :D

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 230

thanks for the response. It's probably best that they don't teach dialects. Puertoriqueños speak differently than Mexicans who speak differently than Andalusians, etc., and it would get out of hand fairly quickly. I just wanted to point out an omission, which I reported.

5 months ago