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  5. "Ella está tomando café ahora…

"Ella está tomando café ahora."

Translation:She is drinking coffee now.

March 23, 2013

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brianfarris

One "takes" tea in the afternoon, surely one could also be taking coffee


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kowalsk1

"Taking" should definitely be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wmunnell

This is a case of language convention. I daresay that unlikely as it is that a Briton would "have tea", it's equally unlikely that an American would "take coffee"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Well, Americans do take a coffee to go from Starbucks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisakeenan2

We actually do 'take a coffee' in the morning. I guess it's just another difference between english english and american english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wmunnell

Although, we do "take" cream and/or sugar in our coffee if we're not "having" it black!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/berijoy

sigh - just when you think you understand a word definition...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larlar7

still not changed 04/23/2016


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leocardz

not changed 6/24/2016


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ozespanol

why will it not accept, "taking" a coffee when that is one of the definitions offered? I know that "taking a coffee" is an unlikely sentence, but this site is full of unlikely sentences!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fluent2B

In Spanish it it very common to hear tomar used for drinking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samsta

Especially in Mexico. "Beber" is more common in Spain but "tomar" is used a lot there too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inckwise

To say "taking" coffee is not unusual at all. I hear it all the time when a host or hostess asks..."Are you taking coffee?" But we would never say that with alcohol..."Do you want a beer?" would be preferred over "Will you take,,"..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/berijoy

Yes, it can be frustrating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wmunnell

I wrote "having coffee", which we say in English. Had the Spanish word been "bebiendo", I'd have translated "drinking". I'm reporting the error, but won't hold my breath waiting for a correction. Notice that rspreng offers examples of the commonly used "have" in English. I would add that this is not usage found only in bars, but in all situations referring to any type of drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jayken

I've never heard of tomar meaning to drink until I came to this website. I always thought it meant to take....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

It is widely used for 'to drink.' Very widely. In a restaurant you'll likely be asked what you're taking rather than drinking, as a USA bartender will ask "What'll ya have?" and we often say "I had a beer" rather than "I drank a beer"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jayken

ahhh that makes sense. thank you :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duomail

I wonder why the answer is in the past, “had“, “drank“.
“I‘ll have a beer“ (?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason463529

In Australia we take a coffee to go, but we don't take a coffee to drink it. But i guess that's language convention for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aprit

I'm just wondering why when they are putting two verbs side by side they are still conjugating the second verb. In college I was told that using the English equivalent (ing) isn't very common in Spanish. Native speakers, I was told don't do that often and when I've listen to Native speakers very seldom to I hear them use gerunds. Instead they leave the second verb in the infinitive form and it can still mean the English equivalent to ing. For example: Ella esta (con accento sobre a) tomar café (accento sobre e) ahora also means: She is drinking coffee now. Just food for thought. I guess the reason we are learning this is because we are learning about gerunds. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

The second verb is a present participle (gerundio) and not a conjugated form. http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-spanish-verb-tomar.html

I heard they often use the present instead of the present progressive. I have not seen the form you are showing with "está". For the future the progressive is also not very used and that is where I have seen the infinitive used more with "ir a" as in "Ella va a tomar café." http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/progressive.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asafas3

What is the difference between tomando and bebiendo?!?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dakota_Marz

Can "She is drinking coffee now" not be translated as "Ella ya está tomando café". "ya" does not only mean "already" it also means a change from the past to the present like the word "now".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gordonjackson1

I do not grasp why DL uses bebiendo and sometime tomando!! They use both for drinking. It wouldn't matter if they marked both correct, but I always seem to choose the one they don't want. Can anyone explain the difference to me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobInco1

I agree She is taking coffee now should be accepted. Bad DL....... go take a coffee break!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mia147712

Still not accepted 04/26/17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KelliF

Still not accepting "taking" coffee ... though people "take" coffee all the time on a break at work, even when they're not drinking any coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnRobert60

taking was my answer ,would drinking not be bebiendo?.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam198671

I answered "She is drinking coffee now and I got it wrong. What gives?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arun512829

Ok, none of these are Gerunds by are progressive tenses. Ah Duo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterB44

Oh come on Duo. I'm in Spain now and the waitress confirms here they say taking a coffee. It may be different in Latin America, but here - in Spain - to take and to drink are absolutely interchangeable - in relation to having a coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew_Bowden

Not changed 4/10/2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter754864

What is most frustrating is that this sentence uses "tomando" which literally is taking or drinking. I would be less critical if it used "bebiendo". And we use drinking and taking interchangeably. 14/10/2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OutCider

Entire lessons telling you that "tomando" is good to use as "drinking", then you put "drinking" here and it's an error...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajivSriva4

"She is having coffee now" is correct per dulingo then why not use teniendo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebecca152496

Wtf?! DL is telling me to Type what you hear, in Spanish and I'm typing what I hear in Spanish, perfectly correctly, and it is not accepting what I am typing?!So frustrating! Have done the same sentence over and over! Am I going mad, or is there a bug in this software?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1sLpibFl

Taking should definitely be allowed!

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