https://www.duolingo.com/RichieGoff

V2 rule in Norwegian

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Hei alle sammen!

Something that has become intuitive with Norwegian, but I never really understood as a rule until I stumbled upon it somewhere else, is the V2 rule.

This first seems to pop up in the Past Perfect lesson but is never explained: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/nb/Past-Perfect/tips-and-notes

Sentences like this are used but the inversion of the second part is never touched upon: Da jeg hadde spist, gikk jeg på skolen. When I had eaten, I went to school.

Maybe there is no reason to add it, but it might be helpful if that is touched on in the notes in this lesson so people are conscious about making the inversion in those cases. A good little explanation can be found here: https://anewlifeinnorway.wordpress.com/norwegian-lingo/grammar-subject-verb-rule/

I thought I would add this to see what the mods thought. I absolutely love the Norwegian course and find it the most entertaining and well executed course on Duolingo, so tusen takk for all your hard work!

9 months ago

2 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991
Mod
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It's actually explained much earlier than the Past Perfect lesson, in the tips and notes for Adverbs.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertAGun1
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There isn't really an inversion. It is a matter of the verb occupying its proper position. In a Norwegian sentence, unless the sentence is imperative, almost invariably a verb (whether a modal or main verb) occupies the second position. Therefore, regardless of what it is that occupies the first position (noun, pronoun, adverb, phrase or subordinate clause) a verb must occupy the second position. Notwithstanding that general rule, an second, accepted structure may exist when "maybe" is used, as demonstrated below.

Kanskje har de sett det før. = Kanskje de har sett det før.

In compound sentences (two sentences connected by a conjunction), the conjunction is not considered an element in determining verb position in the second sentence, as shown in the following sentence: Han er norsk og hun er tysk.

9 months ago
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