"Le commerçant me transfère son courriel."

Translation:The shopkeeper forwards his email to me.

April 28, 2018

25 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SMCG9

Might not commerçant mean merchant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

There is nothing that says this is an online merchant--only that the person is forwarding his email to you. In general, un commerçant = a storekeeper/shopkeeper, un marchand = a merchant, although Oxford French Dictionary includes "shopkeeper". There is enough overlap between the terms that we won't argue it here. A "site marchand" may be either an "online store/shop" or a "retail outlet" (brick-and-mortar).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agonisti

"The merchant transfers me his email" isn't accepted, though.


[deactivated user]

    "The merchant is forwarding me his email" is accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

    Yes, it does. Especially online. You talk about an online merchant, not an online shopkeeper.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew110653

    Why not "transfer"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agonisti

    It is a supremely DL move not to allow "transfèrer" to be translated as "transfer".

    (It absolutely does mean that.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

    Because we don't transfer emails.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sucy-en-Brie94

    The shopkeeper forwards me his email. Accepted :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrenchCrazy

    I got worried after I hit accept, luckily they took it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SMCG9

    Could also be storekeeper


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

    Yes, "shopkeeper" is more likely in the U.K. Otherwise, "storekeeper".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margaret400859

    Prefer 'merchant'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rkwnyc
    • 1196

    Why is "courriel electronique" rejected?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dospescados

    It should be accepted, of course, with the accent over the first e of électronique. I say that and nobody has corrected me yet.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamNoir

    Could it be that the shopkeeper forwards me HER email if we were talking about a woman in the prior context?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

    In regard of forwarding email, I would now express this as, "The merchant forwards me his email." Yes, to be forwarded has become a thing. :-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    This was happening with mail, and so described, long before e-mail was invented.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

    In the type what you hear form of exercise, how does "courriels" sound different to "courriel?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    It doesn't, but "ses courriels" sounds different from "son courriel".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    I think it's an option, though the word is a bit old-fashioned outside of specific technical contexts that would need to be indicated with a modifier in either language unless the kind of "trader" were already clear.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisaskier

    I've been told that "Courriel" is very old fashioned and is no longer in use, the term used here in the Haute Savoie region of France is simply E-Mail.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    It's not old-fashioned (how old-fashioned can a word for "e-mail" be?), but its use isn't as widespread in France as the Académie would like.

    It was created in Quebec where it has become the common term. It's been endorsed by the Académie and is the "official" term in France, and you'll see it used by institutions that share the goal of avoiding "franglais". However, in France it isn't widely used colloquially. This is because it post-dates the uptake of "e-mail", not because it's old-fashioned.

    Some French publications will mainly use "e-mail" but throw in "courriel" from time to time to avoid repetition.

    Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.