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"¿Qué tienes que hacer ahora mismo?"

Translation:What do you have to do right now?

April 30, 2018

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitryPogo

What does "mismo" mean in the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marciano420

I think it puts further emphasis on ahora or now. Basically it's the difference between 'right now' and just 'now'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

Yes, "mismo" usually means "same". Here, "ahora mismo" literally means "now itself".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkat
  • 632

so, now NOW?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

"ahora mismo" and "ahorita" both mean "right now".
"Mismo" provides a bit of emphasis as does the "-ita" ending in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FabioB269943

What is the correct sentence? The suggested "What have you got to do right now?" or "What do you have to do right now?" Is there any difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allison642418

I think they're both technically correct but it depends on where you live (especially in the US), I'm from the northeast and we rarely say "what have you got to do right now", we'd say the 2nd sentence you suggest. I think in the southern us they use "have you got to do" more often. To me "you got" sounds strange even though it's not technically wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hjh788272

Your second option was accepted 13/7/18 - but why cannot it be "What must you do"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Must" is more used for your own desires while "have to" tends to be used for obligations from outside. But there isn't a sharp difference made between them. "Must" is usually translated as deber.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjustus31

Is ahora mismo vs ahorita based on location/dialect or is it more a speakers choice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shiona977397

What have you to do right now. I answered as above and was wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaBarle2

Duo doesn't like 'right away' for'right now'. It's the same in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudgeHill

Can "ahora mismo" be translated by something other than "right now"? I have just had "immediately" marked wrong but I have never said "right now" and never will.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

You could try "at the moment" or "just now".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nunie19

What have you to do right now? wasn't excepted but surely it has the same meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/despuesvengo

British and American? Maybe that's the difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger654478

Does mismo mean correctly here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

Mismo is the right in the English phrase right now. It has nothing to do with correctly. It is used to emphasize now. Right now = immediately, or at this time, at the moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger654478

What, do you have to do the right thing now! Is this what it means?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

No, it's using the phrase right now, which means at this moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger654478

If now means 'at this moment' what does 'right now' mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"At this very moment", maybe? "Right now" isn't semantically different from "now", but it puts extra emphasis on that it is indeed this very moment and not just "approximately now".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dum528862

Why is "mismo" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

To make the "now" into a "right now".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joseph665400

What do you have to do at the moment? Is this incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Not precisely incorrect, but a different choice of words.

  • ahora mismo - right now
  • en este momento - at the moment

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glendq0

I often by mistake type a translation rather than the words in spanish, as, for example, asked in this question. It would be great if Duolingo would let me retry rather than marking it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Duo lets you retry at the end of the practice session.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesDismu

What are you having to do right now? Is this OK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It sounds a bit off. Usually "to have to" (or "to have" in general) is not used in the progressive form in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeverkaCiperka1

Why not "just now"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Veverka, if "just now" is something you commonly say about an event that's happening at this moment, it's also fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John538081

The drop-down clue for "hacer" shows "to have" OR "to do" among the three choices with "to have" listed first, but when I wrote "What do you have to HAVE right now", it was marked incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

"Hacer" = "To make" or "To do"

https://www.spanishdict.com/translate/hacer

Someone screwed up... "Haber" is "To have"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ades.Gabriel

But the sentences have the exact same meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y0rkshire

"What have you to do right now" is correct British English of standard usage. Is there a rational reason for its being refused acceptance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Yorkshire, the reason seems to be that it's not quite standard usage anymore. Doulingo usually doesn't accept "have you" constructions, but you're free to report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueClarke0

You can also say "what have you to do right now", it's slightly more formal but is correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan327121

Once again the female voice fails to clearly pronounce the "s" in "tienes", which resulted in my "tiene" being marked wrong. I think the "tiene" would be marked correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John538081

I've had the same issue with the female, as well as the male, voice running words and sounds together. SO...First I listen to "her" and type my response, but before I send it to "her", I listen to the slower speed and I adjust my answer accordingly. Sometimes I forget that final step, and I curse like a sailor!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike788913

"...right away" is just as good a translation as "right now". It's common usage in British English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kae530960

Does right away and right now mean the same thing in Spanish?

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