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"El café está en el tercer piso."

Translation:The café is on the third floor.

April 30, 2018

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayeEHagma

I'm confused about when to use "tercer" or "tercero for masculine "third".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katiebdenver

When third is used in front of a masculine singular noun (like "piso"), use "tercer", when after use "tercero". To use "tercero", it would need to come after "piso": "El café está en el piso tercero." This is true for "primer/primero" (first) as well. When modifying feminine nouns, the adjective "primera/tercera" doesn't change based on location to the noun (e.g. "Trabajo en la primera/tercera oficina."). Other words also lose part of their ending when used before versus after nouns like "bueno" becomes "buen" when modifying masculine nouns ("Es un buen precio" versus "Es un precio bueno"). "Grande" becoming "gran" in front of masculine and feminine nouns. Grammatically, this rule is called "apócope". Generally, adjectives come after instead of before nouns, words that are "apocopadas" are the exception. Some more examples: http://elblogdegramatica.blogspot.com/2012/11/definicion-de-apocope-ejemplos-de.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelise_627

Thank you so much for your explanation! The extra comparisons with buen/ bueno were also a great help since I was confused about those as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katiebdenver

Sure! I'm glad it was helpful. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DodoJarmann

That’s a lingot-worthy answer, katiebdenver


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajnoche

Thanks much for the link!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdrewy

for those who don't know in most Spanish speaking countries the third floor would be our fourth floor! This is because the way there house structure works is "La Planta Baja" is the ground floor this would be our first floor (usualmente los Espanoles no tiene el sotano: basement). Then they have the next floor which they call "el primer piso" the first floor, but we would call it the second floor. This goes on forever in the same sequence and i thought it would be nice for everyone to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DodoJarmann

Muy util! Un lingot para ti.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

Other than context is there a difference between coffee and café in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gherson

Why está and not es?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaBeaty75

Use està for location.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henrystas

does not tercero mean third?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chuckdumas

yes. Tercero is an "apocope".

katiebdenver earlier in this thread explains it very well

When third is used in front of a masculine singular noun (like "piso"), use "tercer", when after use "tercero". To use "tercero", it would need to come after "piso": "El café está en el piso tercero." This is true for "primer/primero" (first) as well. When modifying feminine nouns, the adjective "primera/tercera" doesn't change based on location to the noun (e.g. "Trabajo en la primera/tercera oficina."). Other words also lose part of their ending when used before versus after nouns like "bueno" becomes "buen" when modifying masculine nouns ("Es un buen precio" versus "Es un precio bueno"). "Grande" becoming "gran" in front of masculine and feminine nouns. Grammatically, this rule is called "apócope". Generally, adjectives come after instead of before nouns, words that are "apocopadas" are the exception.

Linguistically: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocope

Explained in Spanish: http://elblogdegramatica.blogspot.com/2012/11/definicion-de-apocope-ejemplos-de.html

algún ; alguien, buen ; bueno, cien ; ciento, cualquier ; cualquiera, gran ; grande, mal ; malo, ningún ; ninguno, primer ; primero, san ; santo, tercer ; tercero,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dublin27

could this also be translates as "the coffee is on the third floor?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Le_Pain_Perdu_22

Given context, it's more likely that the speaker was talking about a café, but it's completely reasonable for them to maybe have been talking about coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dgp685333

Why is cafetería not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnpadhVidv

Cafetería is generally something that is part of a larger institution, such as an office or a school. A café is generally an independent business, not attached to anything else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnpadhVidv

How do you know if the café is on the third floor or if the coffee is on the third floor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin821886

The female voice in this sentence is difficult to understand at full speed. It is nice to have the slow option, but if I had to listen to her in "real life", I would never understand anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Savethegaywhales

In my translation to English I used "cafe" without an accent, why way this not accepted? I understand the logic, but since English strips accents from borrowed words without compunction, this seems a little odd?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sousquark

I tried “The cafe is on the third floor” (without the accent) and it was accepted (2018-09-16).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaMa137680

I can't see the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragohombre

There are no accents in English... it is cafe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HossElharmeil

It's rare bu does exist café is one case where it does


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

Yes, when any diacritics remain in English, they are almost always loanwords, like café. Personally, I would always write it with the acute accent, even though the word wouldn't otherwise be confused with a different one, or another pronunciation. I still use the grave accent on "blessèd" for reasons of pronunciation, even though it is probably now considered archaic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

And where they are still used they are entirely optional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bdbarber

There are no accents in English? That's newsto me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linabuela

There are NO accents in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

Well, they are "optional" for certain borrowed words.

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