"Yo voy a mi trabajo a las siete y media."

Translation:I go to my job at seven thirty.

9 months ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chris610088

I struggled with las siete vs los siete and Los viernes vs las viernes. I found a website that helped me. According to the Spainsh Dictionary website, it has to do with hours (horas) which is feminine and days(dias) which is masculine.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zsooofija

thank you!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoKawsar

It's always el/los for 7 days name.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonyhay

No one in England would say "go to my job"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF
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I think the point of putting in this phrasing in was to emphasise my job, ie el trabajo - work as a noun rather than a verb.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emesheryan

Thank you! I wanted to say the same thing. Apparently 'i'm going to work' was not okay... :(

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
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"I go to work" was okay (I had this under "Routines 1").

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Tessbee, I had the sentence under routines, too. But it seems one could imply different meanings if you leave out mi ("my" being commonly used, related to "job" or other similar nouns, like workplace.)

For ex: If you say "I go to work," it likely could mean the infinitive verb. That could mean, speaking of a resort or other vacation site, "I go (there) to work, but she goes (there) to relax. I go to MY work would not be the same translation - that's like you expect your work won't come to you, so you have to go (travel) to it, which doesn't sound like something as commonly said.

And did someone say they would NEVER say "I go to my job," in England? I find that odd - a person may teach school in England 9 months of the year, and then have a summer job in France, couldn't they? In which case, they may correctly say, "I go to my job (on the Riviera in France) in June."

I guess context could rule, with this sentence!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Works for me too.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spectrateknix

Could not "trabajo" be translated as "workplace" in this case?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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Sure, that's good.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry426988

My answer should be accepted as work is the first word listed in the hover.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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The noun "work" when referring to your workplace, is usually an.. impersonal(?) noun in English. That means it usually doesn't get articles or possessives. It's just "go to work", "be at work", and so on.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry426988

My answer should be accepted as work is the first word listed in the hover.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SAMujer
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The hover is not meant to be used in that way. The hover tells you that work can be appropriate in some sentences. Trabajar is also a verb so I have found it more useful when describing what you are working at. For example, Yo trabajo a la fábrica. I work at the factory. The hover is a generalization of all uses and is used to get your thinking cap on. In this case they wanted you to use it a a noun, mi trabajo (my job).

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dianepcook
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Why wasn't "7:30 am" accepted? I have never seen "7 30" used anywhere.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StealthMaster77

Dianapcook - It could just as easily be 7:30 PM that is meant as it might be 7:30 AM; that part isn't specified, so it could be either. Quite a few people I know seldom specify "AM" or "PM".... they seem to rely on the wider context to indicate which is which.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul862466

Because it never states which half of the day it is.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke394640

I go to my work at 730.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaomiJ2000

¿Media? I thought "treinta" was thirty. Can someone help me?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spectrateknix

Treinta is 30. But when telling time in Spanish, if the minutes are at 30, you say "y media" after the hour. It's kind of like saying "half past nine", meaning 9:30 in English, since "media" might be be translated as "a half" in this case.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SAMujer
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Thank you Spectrateknix, have a lingot.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert877622

Media means middle, middle of the hour. son las ocho menos cuarto=quarter to 8

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

I'm interested in the use of "las" here. I'm presuming it's because, in this case, it's an every day occurrence. If, however, it was a one time thing would one use the singular "la"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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The original phrase is "a las siete horas" - "to the seven hours" literally. And since hora is feminine, you need to use las here.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spectrateknix

I think it has more to do with the fact that "siete" or 7 as a value is more than one. So one would probably be "el uno", where any value greater than 1 would be plural.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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The time, "at 1 o'clock", would be "a la una" in Spanish.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikaAln

Voy a = I'm going to....here I go to?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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It can be either. If you say "ir a [location]", like here, it means that you're going somewhere, so both "to go to [location]" and "to be going to [location]" are appropriate translations.

  • Voy a la escuela. - I am going to school. / I go to school.

But you can also use that verb for the phrasal future tense, "ir a [verb]", which has the same meaning as the English "to be going to [verb]".

  • Voy a aprender mucho. - I am going to learn a lot.
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WH-Paul
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In England we would say "I go to work at seven thirty" not sure if it would be accepted here because I daren't try.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathy336369

That is what we would say here in the US as well, but I think as someone said above they want to emphasize that el trabajo is a noun. To others who wonder why their possible answer was not accepted - this is not google translate which is not always accurate. In duo each possible answer must be individually entered and the program looks at what has been entered only. That´s why every possible translation doesn´t work. I type seven thirty and that works so I stick with it througout duo.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miprofile4

Wondering why 'a' is needed before defining a specific time.

The case with days: Yo trabajo los viernes (no 'a')

Shouldn't it be the same?: Yo siempre trabajo las siete y media

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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You don't say "I work at Fridays" in English either. :)

Clock times are expressed with the construction "a la(s) xx (hora(s))", literally translating as "to the xx hour(s)". It makes about as much sense as saying "xx o'clock" in English.

Clock times take a, daytimes take por or en, specific days don't take prepositions, and months, seasons, and years take en.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenverPesi2

I am not here to complain nor to give any corrections but I am just surprised how Spanish drastically gave impact to us Filipinos especially in our language. I'm a Filipino and I speak Bisaya (a local dialect here in PH) Most of our words do have borrowed words from Español. I guess I ain't having a hard time learning and memorizing Spanish words at the first place.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimnation
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"Go to work" doesn't work?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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"Mi trabajo" is used here, specifically, so it should be "to my work" or "to my job".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentaPoole

We say "go to work" also. my answer should have been accepted.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bren219278

^

8 months ago
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