"Yo voy a mi trabajo a las siete y media."

Translation:I go to my job at seven thirty.

6 months ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chris610088

I struggled with las siete vs los siete and Los viernes vs las viernes. I found a website that helped me. According to the Spainsh Dictionary website, it has to do with hours (horas) which is feminine and days(dias) which is masculine.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zsooofija

thank you!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoKawsar

It's always el/los for 7 days name.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spectrateknix

Could not "trabajo" be translated as "workplace" in this case?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Sure, that's good.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonyhay

No one in England would say "go to my job"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF
0KyfnlOF
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I think the point of putting in this phrasing in was to emphasise my job, ie el trabajo - work as a noun rather than a verb.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emesheryan

Thank you! I wanted to say the same thing. Apparently 'i'm going to work' was not okay... :(

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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"I go to work" was okay (I had this under "Routines 1").

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry426988

My answer should be accepted as work is the first word listed in the hover.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The noun "work" when referring to your workplace, is usually an.. impersonal(?) noun in English. That means it usually doesn't get articles or possessives. It's just "go to work", "be at work", and so on.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry426988

My answer should be accepted as work is the first word listed in the hover.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SAMujer
SAMujer
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The hover is not meant to be used in that way. The hover tells you that work can be appropriate in some sentences. Trabajar is also a verb so I have found it more useful when describing what you are working at. For example, Yo trabajo a la fábrica. I work at the factory. The hover is a generalization of all uses and is used to get your thinking cap on. In this case they wanted you to use it a a noun, mi trabajo (my job).

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dianepcook

Why wasn't "7:30 am" accepted? I have never seen "7 30" used anywhere.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StealthMaster77

Dianapcook - It could just as easily be 7:30 PM that is meant as it might be 7:30 AM; that part isn't specified, so it could be either. Quite a few people I know seldom specify "AM" or "PM".... they seem to rely on the wider context to indicate which is which.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul862466

Because it never states which half of the day it is.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke394640

I go to my work at 730.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

I'm interested in the use of "las" here. I'm presuming it's because, in this case, it's an every day occurrence. If, however, it was a one time thing would one use the singular "la"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The original phrase is "a las siete horas" - "to the seven hours" literally. And since hora is feminine, you need to use las here.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spectrateknix

I think it has more to do with the fact that "siete" or 7 as a value is more than one. So one would probably be "el uno", where any value greater than 1 would be plural.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The time, "at 1 o'clock", would be "a la una" in Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikaAln
MikaAln
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Voy a = I'm going to....here I go to?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It can be either. If you say "ir a [location]", like here, it means that you're going somewhere, so both "to go to [location]" and "to be going to [location]" are appropriate translations.

  • Voy a la escuela. - I am going to school. / I go to school.

But you can also use that verb for the phrasal future tense, "ir a [verb]", which has the same meaning as the English "to be going to [verb]".

  • Voy a aprender mucho. - I am going to learn a lot.
3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WH-Paul
WH-Paul
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In England we would say "I go to work at seven thirty" not sure if it would be accepted here because I daren't try.

5 days ago
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