"Hijo,lávateahora."

Translation:Son, wash yourself now.

7 months ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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For anyone learning English, saying "wash your hands," "wash your face" or some other part of the body seem much more common than "wash yourself." Most people are fairly specific when talking to a small child about what exactly needs to be washed. To be more general, we more often say "go wash," "go take a shower" or "go take a bath."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh695473

In the US at least, we often say "[go] wash up".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Really? When it is the person? In UK that almost always mean the dishes!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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"Son, wash up now" was accepted Sept5/18.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joseph_d_stein

However "Son can you wash up now" is not how annoying on every other exercise they seem to want the "can"

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MasterYods
MasterYods
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How do you know it's supposed to be lávate and not lavate?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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lávate is the form and lavate is the vos form. I don't think they ever use the vos conjugation as the default answer.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmexicodf

lávate is an order, hence the accent and the attached pronoun

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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The accent shows how to pronounce it. Lava by itself would naturally be prounced with accent on the first a (or really, next to last -"penultimate"), but when you add -te, it shifts to the second a, still next to last, which is you you distinguish the singular imperative "wash yourself" with the "vosotros" (in Spain) form without the reflexive particle, as in Vosotras lavate la ropa".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abs1973
abs1973
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The conjugation of vos has nothing to do with the conjugation of vosotros.

Vos is used in stead of tú (2nd person singular) in certain countries in America, mainly Argentina.

Vosotros (not vuestros, which is the possesive pronoun) is the informal 2nd person plural, and it is used in Spain. In America is not used as they always use the formal one (ustedes) in every situation. They have kept the formal/informal distinction in the singular though (tú/usted).

In the word "Lava" the stress falls on the next to last syllable, so according to the spanish rules of accentuation it has no written accent. In the word "Lávate" (imperative 2nd person singular) the stress falls on the 3rd to last (or first) syllable in a word with 3 syllables so due to accentuation rules it has a marked accent.

The imperative for the 2nd person singular of the verb lavar is always lávate.

Lavate (with no written accent and stressed in the next to last syllable) is not used in Spanish unless you are speaking in the voseo dialect.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Gracias! I've corrected ir, i think. I'm not too strong on vosotros. By the way, vos is used all over central America, at leat from Guatemala to Columbia, as well as Argentina. But in between in some countries they use Tú. I'm not sure where the line goes.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmdadAhmed
EmdadAhmed
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Why is the imperative mood used for tú while the subjunctive is used for usted & ustedes?

Can the subjunctive be used for tú here?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraGalesa
SaraGalesa
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It's just that the imperative forms for usted and ustedes are the same as the subjunctive forms, whereas the positive imperative tú form is different. The negative imperative is the same as the subjunctive form. ...no te laves...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grandmompam

In America we also say "get washed up".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Doesn't that phrase have unpleasant connotations in the US as it does in the UK??

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmadiTalks

Not at all, it simply means to engage in needed ablutions. It might mean washing the face and hands, maybe also brushing teeth, it might mean taking a bit of a sink bath, it might mean taking a shower, depending on the time of day and the circumstances.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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"Son, get washed" should be accepted, but isn't at the moment. (Reported.)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane821964
Jane821964
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No one in the uk would call their son 'buddy'. We are highly unlikely to call them "son" either but I think we all understand the translation

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OgbonnayaI1
OgbonnayaI1
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We seldom say "wash yourself now'. It's always, "bath now". Why is this incorrect? Everyone in DL is not American.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmadiTalks

Another thing that strange about this when is the Spanish. Granted all of the Spanish speakers I know are Latino Americans, but they wouldn’t say “Hijo, lávate ahora.” they’d say “Mi hijo, lávate ahora.” Calling your son just “son” is strange in any language.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aidanmartin3

We don't call our sons "son", we call them buddy or bud depending on age gap

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Just out of curiosity, who are "we" in that assertion? Helps us others understand the social circs (of people who don't acknowledge their sons perhaps?)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whitty_bitty

I am guessing the "we" was referring to people in the US only because I live in the US and realized as I read these comments that I call my toddler son "little buddy" quite often amongst other things (his actual name, his nickname, etc.). It is a term of endearment. People will also shorten it to "bud". Both seem to be used for young to juvenile boys who don't necessarily have to be the son of (or even related to) the person using the term.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
bonbayelPlus
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Or their own name!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane821964
Jane821964
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In English we would say "get washed now". "wash up" as others suggested shouldn't work as the Spanish makes it clear he is being commanded to wash himself, "wash up" implies washing the dishes

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh695473

"Wash up" does not imply washing dishes in the US. As I said in another comment, it's common in the US to say, "wash up," to mean wash one's body. E.g. it is often said to children before dinner, meaning they should wash their hands.

1 month ago
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