"Una cartera marrón."

Translation:A brown purse.

6 months ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FOSyay
FOSyay
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Is there a way too differentiate wallets and purses in Spanish?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michleduff1

In Spain a wallet is a cartera, a handbag is a bolso, and a plastic bag is a bolsa.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

In the 1960's a cartera was only a wallet or billfold, and a bolsa was a lady's handbag or a moneybag attached to the belt of medieval merchants (from that particular meaning came "bolsa" as the name for a stock exchange). Are there any other perros viejos out there who know how long ago the meanings changed, because I can't recall when it happened.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstelleTweedie
EstelleTweedie
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So here a cartera is a wallet, which we often call a purse in English, and a bolso is a handbag which in America is called a purse?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathrynLew10

More than often, a purse is called a bag. Short for handbag.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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In the southeastern US, pocketbook is also used for purse.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Becky393451

Thank you. I was looking for this answer as in the US a purse is what the English would call a handbag. To the English a purse is a females wallet. I was unsure which one careta was so I REALLY appreciate you clearing this up!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaomiJ2000

Why is it "marrón" and not "color café"??? Are they the same just one is used more in other places than others or are they used for different nouns??? Can someone please help me???

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EquanimousLingo
EquanimousLingo
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It may be a regional preference as I have always used Marrón vice color café since growing up. (Born in Dominican Republic, spanish speaker for 34 years)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Essperetta
Essperetta
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In Argentina café is a darker brown than marrón but we don't really use it much.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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There are multiple words for brown in Spanish: marrón, café, castaño, pardo, moreno (for skin and hair), and bronceado (for skin). From what I've seen posted by native speakers, it looks like there are regional variations in terms of which are used more commonly and to what shade of brown they refer. In fact, I've seen some posts which said that moreno can be considered derogatory in some places.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/brown

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgoodridge1

I'm in Puerto Peñasco, MX, and a purse is called una bolsa.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/operabunny

In England we have 1) a purse; small, for paper money, bank/credit cards and coins - usually for women 2) a wallet; small and flat, for paper money and bank/credit cards - usually for men 3) a bag; for keeping larger items and shopping (so you would keep your purse in your bag.)

How would you differentiate between those in Spanish?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstelleTweedie
EstelleTweedie
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I would also like to know!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraMariaT15

What does cartera mean?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/therabbit86ed

It means wallet, but in certain countries that speak Spanish, like Venezuela, it can also mean purse

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstelleTweedie
EstelleTweedie
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And does a purse mean a handbag in Venezuela as it does in the USA?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stacy83539

When are you suppose to use Un and Una?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nc.chelle
nc.chelle
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Generally in Spanish, nouns and pronouns are either masculine or feminine. If a noun or pronoun is masculine, the articles and adjectives that describe it need to be in agreement by using their masculine form. Likewise, a feminine noun/pronoun requires feminine articles and adjectives. Be aware that some adjectives have only one form which is used in all cases.

In Spanish, un is the masculine form of a/an, and una is the feminine form.

Generally, but most definitely not always, nouns/pronouns ending in "a" are feminine and in "o" masculine. Whether or not a noun is masculine is arbitrary, so don't try working out the pattern. A wall (la pared) is feminine just because it is. Why is a bridge (un puente) masculine? Because.

Here are some links that discuss the topics more thoroughly. I find all of these sites useful for sussing out rules and furthering my education in Spanish. You're honestly better off doing that that listening to anyone here. We're all just other students, and lots of folks post incorrect info in these comments. I've done it. I didn't mean to do it but, nevertheless, I did. If all else fails, don't place your confidence in anything unsourced.

Gender of Nouns in Spanish (Thoughtco) https://www.thoughtco.com/gender-inherent-characteristic-of-spanish-nouns-3079266

Masculine and Feminine Nouns in Spanish (SpanishDict) https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/masculine-and-feminine-nouns

Spanish Lesson 13 Beginners: Masculine Feminine (Be aware this features UK English & Peninsular Spanish) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZL5lg6d_qlk

FULL DISCLOSURE: Native English speaker - US, Southern Appalachian dialect. Other uses of English may vary. Advice about Spanish should be taken with a grain of salt.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John984953

Anyone else think saying "una cartera marrón" is fun when you get rolling the "r"s?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathrynLew10

I could have sworn that I rolled my r's! It said I said it wrong.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielleD323195

What is marmaid in spanil

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

"Sirena," related linguistically to the creatures Ulises el griego heard.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielleD323195

What is gun

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaren313390

Why would yoh want to know that

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaren313390

You typo

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daphnel22

When you speak in spanish you might need to be talking about a purse.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/franeek83
franeek83
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Before change brown was 'cafe'. What the f*#k?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sumxs1
Sumxs1
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Lo sé pero brown=marrón y café =coffee colored brown. This makes more sense to me. Might be why they changed it? Tranquilo.

4 months ago
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