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  5. "I do not have time."

"I do not have time."

Translation:Io non ho tempo.

March 24, 2013

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeNico

Why "non ho il tempo" is false?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertocatini

It has a slighty different meaning. Adding il you are referring to the time needed to do a specific thing. I'm not a native English speaker but I think you would translate it I don't have the time [to do this]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3_pipit

But "I don't have time" also means "I don't have the time [to do this]" doesn't it? I don't know which other context you would use "I don't have time."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertocatini

What I wanted to say is that "Non ho il tempo" sounds very odd by itself (i.e. without specifying what you are supposed to do). But I suppose it may work as an answer to a question that specifies the activity.

Do the English expressions have the same exact meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deniaridley

Normally "I don't have the time" means one of two things in English: I don't have time to do a specific thing. OR it can be in response to someone asking what time it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Telisa7

Are you a native Italian speaker? I'm still learning when to use il (et al) and when not to or how to interpret it exactly from Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertocatini

Hi, I'm an Italian speaker. Unfortunately there are no simple rules, just a long list of exceptions: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Articolo_(linguistica)#Uso

In this case I believe that the rule is similar for Italian and English: "the time/il tempo" can be understood as "the amount of time needed to do a specific action", while "time" (without the article) is just an abstract noun. Since the English version doesn't have the article, I would feel its addition as an improper modification of the meaning of the phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bebatjof

In my language (dutch), saying "i don't have THE time" - "io non ho il tempo", would mean that you don't know what time it is, that you don't have a watch/clock(/phone) with you. Could this work for Italian? (English?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deniaridley

It means that in English too. Someone could ask what time it is for instance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Russell204109

It's completely interchangeable in English. I'm not quite sure why it's being debated so much.

I don't have the time (to go to the shop) I don't have the time (my battery is dead (waving phone)) I don't have time (to go to the shop) Do you have time (to go to the shop) Do you have the time (to go to the top).

The main point here is that the italian didn't include the article.

I believe to ask the time it's something like.

Sai che ore sono


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucapiercey

Could I also use the word 'volta' here or does that not make sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mukkapazza

Volta doesn't work in situations that can be counted in hours and minutes (like your example, not having time) but it works in other translations of time:

  • Uno alla volta/one at a time
  • Da quella volta/from that time, since then
  • A volte/sometimes, at times
  • Ogni volta che/each time that...

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theelox

Would "Non ho ora" be semantically equal to this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/godfather21

Why not io non ho tempo? Im confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb

It's correct too. It's even the best answer for Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Canottiere

Why not "Non ho ne tempo"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2559

"né" is "neither/nor". If you wanted to say "I have neither time nor money" then you would say "Non ho né tempo né denaro". But since there is only one thing, then just like in English, you would not say "I have neither time", you would simply say "Non ho tempo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gan598234

Im nearly sure ora was coupled with time in some of those pick the pairs from before


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoryJames89

Why is "Io ho non tempo" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2559

Because the negation must always come before the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eleventydeventy

What about "non ho di tempo"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theelox

What about "Non ho del tempo"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenAn1

what about "non vedo l'ora"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJTitmus

This is an italian expression that means 'I can't wait '(e.g. to see you again)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KunzVogelgesang

Didn't we learn, in an earlier lesson, that "non vedo l'ora" is a translation of this? I tried it and it was rejected. I'm puzzled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2559

No, "non vedo l'hora" is an idiom that means "I can't wait".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamie36257

So it's like the difference between "I don't have time" and "I don't have the time"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2559

I don't think "Non vedo l'hora" has anything to do with having time to do something, or knowing what time it is. As far as I know, it's like our "I can't wait", as in "I can't wait to do that" or "I can't wait for that to happen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamie36257

OK. Thanks for the clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KunzVogelgesang

Whether to include the definite article or not seems a vexed question in Italian. In another thread, there is a post advising that including the definite article in any case of doubt will make you correct 99% of the time; apparently this sentence is in the remaing 1%! But I cannot extract any rule which would help me elsewhere...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crollyanne

Why does this need the pronoun 'io'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2559

It doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve545016

Non ho tempo is wrong??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KennethMei5

Can I say "non ho tempo" or when do I need to say "io non ho"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2559

The subject pronoun is typically optional. You'd make sure to include it if you wanted to be emphatic, like "Well maybe you don't, but I do."

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