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"Unsere komplette zweite Mannschaft ist weg."

Translation:Our complete second team is gone.

March 24, 2013

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DylanSpano

Warum nicht "ganze" in der Stelle aus "komplette"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anca7

Could we say "Our complete second team has left?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haleygrace

It doesn't make very much sense in English. But you could say that "our entire second team has left."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BPolgardy

'weg' is pronounced incorrectly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalvanTivadar

Jawoll! I have reported (several times).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andu444

Me too, it's still wrong 2 years later...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reza7Kianersi

Weg in the meaning of way, will be pronounced like "e" in "eager" or "weed. But when it means gone, it will be pronounced like "e" in "egg"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lazar.ljubenovic

What's this sentence doing in Adjectives in Accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MindToSoundMusic

The accurate way in English in order to get the proper equivalent in German is either: "The entire second team is gone." or "The second team is completely gone."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brodjaga

Why not good "has gone"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProjectHopeless

I see nothing wrong with "Our second team has gone." Report it, if you don't mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlindG

I think "has left" and "has gone" imply that the team was there before but then left (which I believe translates to "ist gegangen"), while the german text only states that the team is not there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin_Cope

In English, both "The team is gone" and "The team has gone" imply that the team was there before. But the former is incompatible with the team returning, whereas the latter is not:

"The team is gone but has returned" is nonsense. "The team has gone but has returned" is sensible.

If the German text only states that the team is not there, as BlindG says, then a more faithful translation would be "The entire second team is elsewhere". I don't know whether Duolingo accepts this translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProjectHopeless

Ah, yes, good thinking. I totally agree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5pOIuA5z

replace complete by entire


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vkilohani

Not sure about the German, but the English translation is clumsy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charodeika

Did this sentence mean "all members of the second team are gone"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lev.levitsky

"The whole team is gone", probably


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

It accepted "Our entire second team is away."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamaicarose2

I put it that way too. "Entire" seems more natural to say in this case then "complete". And "away" is what "weg" means, not "has left".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gildesh

Is it any difference between gone and missing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

Yes. 'Gone' means that they left or they were taken, and you may or may not know where they are, and 'missing' means that you don't know what happened to them but you can't find them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philster043

I was marked wrong for typing "Our second team is completely gone." Should komplette have been before weg for my translation to be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Yes! See the following, search down on "placement of nicht": http://www.dartmouth.edu/~german/Grammatik/WordOrder/WordOrder1.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/triklogl

Alle Kommentare sind hoch interessant, kein Zweifel! Aber mich würde zunächst einmal äußerst interessieren, ob der Gebrauch von „komplette“ für Mutterspracher akzeptabel ist!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

Ja, es ist ein ganz normaler Alltagsbegriff. Also absolut akzeptabel. :)

Ich bin übrigens absolut begeistert von deinem Kommentar. Wortwahl: perfekt. Grammatik: perfekt. Rechtschreibung: beinahe perfekt. (Es heißt "Muttersprachler" und nicht "Mutterspracher".)

Ich bewundere dein Sprachtalent und hoffe, dass du es weiterhin gut zu nutzen wissen wirst.

Achja, wenn dieser Kommentar zu schwierig sein sollte, schreib mir das einfach. Ich habe hier kein bisschen darauf geachtet, mich leicht verständlich auszudrücken, in der Hoffnung, dass du das als willkommene Herausforderung siehst und dich nicht darüber ärgerst. ;)

Mach weiter so! Du bist toll!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xavier036

What this sentence even mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lazar.ljubenovic

It means that every single member of the team, which is classified as "second team" (in some context that we don't have), is gone -- either gone to have a lunch or they all disappeared on a hiking trip never to be seen again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HealThySelf

"is" (current tense) and "gone" (past tense) rather than 'has gone' both past tense? is this correct DL?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkhorse

Yes, because gone in this case is an adjective and carries no tense, rather than being the past participle of the word 'go'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/learning0wl

Somehow I imagined it to be the 'dundundunnnn' gone and not the 'guys, let's sneak out for bier und bretzeln' gone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oyoyo4
  • 1096

'Mannschaft ist weg'... is 'weg' also possibly translated to 'away'? Can I translate this sentence, 'is away' instead of 'gone' ? or 'ist weg' only means 'gone' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5pOIuA5z

The English translation should read..... our entire second team is away. Or ..... all of our second team is away.

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