"Nemusím se ani snažit."

Translation:I don't even have to be trying.

10 months ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/thzSd8ff

This sounds like CzEnglish to me.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samfarrell1

Absolutely. I think the natural English (I'm Canadian) phrase would be, "I don't even have to try"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
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Which one?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoneheadBass
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For what it's worth, I (native US English speaker).don't see anything at all wrong with it, and I can easily imagine saying or hearing someone else say it. Might be used to give a little more emphasis than "I don't even have to try"... Something like "I don't even have to be TRYING to win when I play chess with him... he's soooo bad..."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Travis0
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I can see your point, but without those extra qualifiers this definitely seems like czenglish to me as well

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/artlessdodger

Sorry, but I (also a native US English speaker) find this sentence very unnatural. "Have" is acting as the main verb, so it would be followed by an infinitive, no? EX: "I have to sell more cookies." When it's followed by a continuous form (not to mention negation) it sounds strange. In your example, we would say, " I don't even have to try to win when I play chess with him... " This is a statement about a general truth and would require the present simple, not continuous.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hatch-Slack
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"I do not even have to try", is accepted?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
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sure, just try yourself

3 months ago
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