"That does not make a difference!"

Translation:Das macht nichts aus!

May 7, 2018

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sriajuda
  • 20
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 5

Actually, that translation is plain wrong. Correct:

"Das macht keinen Unterschied!" or "Das ändert nichts!"

"Das macht nichts aus!" translates to:

"That does not matter."

The difference is less subtle than one might first think, in both languages.

BTW, none of these are idioms, in neither language. Just straightforward, normal sentences.

May 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson
Plus
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 892

I have seen "das macht nichts" translated as 'It doesn't matter' in this unit. I've never come across "ausmachen" as a verb. I presume it's a separable verb? It totally threw me - I'd no idea how to translate it.

August 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TiffanyTea01

I felt the same way - we have not been introduced to "aus" at all yet.

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 3
  • 61

Does not matter ~= has no impact/effect ~= makes no difference.

Different transliterations, same meaning.

But in any case, a couple of minutes with Google shows a number of sources claiming that one meaning of ausmachen is make a difference.

So I don't understand why you are making such a bold blanket assertion that it's "plain wrong".

Why is the meaning of ausmachen different between (say) das macht viel aus and das macht nichts aus?

Perhaps you could show your sources?

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/bob346783

"I hate duo, filled with full of ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ that does not make sense at all... I learn a lot of wrong sentences and i dont even know which sentence is wrong, only realize them when i encounter a native speaker and speak smth out of context and defend it to death... Than i try to unlearn those which is freakin annoying

Hate u duo, earn a lot of money via ads everywhere and cant even teach us proper sht. Please hire pro linguistics and fix all ur db Ps we can not even consider ourselves b1 even finishing whole the duo" said someone on reddit once but i cant share a link cause i guess he or she deleted the comment nvm i trust duo and everything seems 100% correct

November 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Noelle358367

Then if you hate Duolingo so much, why have you made it this far down the tree?

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rarar.
  • 13
  • 11

So [Das macht nichts aus!] is a phrase to memorise as it is ?

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
Mod
  • 25
  • 12
  • 2

Yep! (Such phrases are called "idioms").

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil483101

Why was das macht nichts not accepted?

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tucatnev

That was my question too but as you can see this is an idiom.

September 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipStanley
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 9
  • 4
  • 1783

Another idiomatic expression to memorize, I suppose.

May 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MatthiusDiaz

Think of 'aus' as 'different' in this sentence. So you get "Das macht nichts aus" - "That makes nothing different"

June 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EdTyrone

This is the best explanation thus far, but I haven't seen any definition of 'aus' that means 'different'. It means: from, out, of, dead, off, over, ex, made of, finish, end, touch...but not different.

It simply appears to be a phrase or idiom to just remember.

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
Mod
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

aus here is not a preposition -- it's part of the separable verb ausmachen.

Such prefixed verbs can have meanings that are quite different from the base meaning of the verb or the prefix.

Compare English "make out" -- "The ship was so small that you could just barely make it out as a small speck on the horizon" or "Tom and Mary were making out on the back seat of Tom's car". Two completely different meanings, and neither of them has anything to do with the basic meanings of "make" or "out".

August 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 3
  • 61

If it helps (although mizinamo's point is good) you could think of aus as outward, and the whole thing meaning that has no outward effect i.e. it makes no [perceptible] difference.

Other ways to remember: "out" (the obvious transliteration of aus) can mean "out of place" or "off kilter" (an engineer might say something "off by [amount]" or "out by [amount]"). It implies movement, especially removal or separation (both static and active).

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Muhannad.97

I typed: "Das ist egal" but it hasn't been accepted. Why?

August 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DionneD
  • 22
  • 21
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

I'm still learning, but I think your statement means "that is the same" which is similar, but not the same as "that makes no difference". Also, I came across this statement in my negatives lesson. If you did as well, your version would have avoided negatives entirely.

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 3
  • 61

Good question - "it's all the same to me" is equally valid in English, they're pretty much interchangeable.

December 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Soccer741394

So when should I be using nichts and nicht? I know nichts means nothing but it's being used as if it's nicht.

August 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Valeria923240

what would be the literal translation? Maybe: that makes nothing of (it)? OR (it) makes nothing of that? Is there an impersonal subject or is das the subject? thanks

June 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
Mod
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

"That makes nothing out" would be a literal translation; das is the subject and nichts is the object.

June 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Wren286707

The fact that when we click on the English word "difference" (with the dotted line under it) to show us the translation, it only has two options: "Unterschied" and "Differenz". Therefore, how can a person's translation be incorrect if it uses one of these German words??

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
Mod
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

The drop-down hints are a bit like dictionary entries -- words can have multiple meanings, but usually only one meaning is appropriate in a given sentence.

For example, a "bat" can be a wooden stick for playing baseball, or a flying animal sometimes associated with vampires -- but usually not both at the same time.

And that's not even mentioning idioms, which you can't translate literally -- for example, "I'm going to give you a piece of my mind" does not literally mean that you will take a section of your brain out of your head and hand it to the listener.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JonnaSheya

The clicking/hovering hints can be modified for each sentence separately and can include idioms as well. I have seen plenty of examples of both cases, for example, the hints for the word 'the' usually only have some versions of the correct on or with idioms larger portions of the sentence or even the whole sentence has been translated in the hint to give the correct direction. Therefore, it is only logical that a person doing these exercises thinks that only valid hints are given when clicking a word.

March 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
Mod
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

The system prunes down the list of hints to show, I think usually to at most three, if there are more than that number for a given word. But we don't have any influence over which ones it picks or which order it shows them in.

The hints cannot be (deliberately) modified for each sentence.

March 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/TalesMilet
  • 22
  • 15
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3

"Nothing is made out of it!"

July 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Casey152078

Never heard the wod "aus" added in Germany. Only "macht nichts."

December 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 3
  • 61

That's literally "does nothing" => has no effect.

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Mano731544

Why Das macht keine differenz is not accepted

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
Mod
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Because that's not how you say it in German -- that's not idiomatic.

A bit like how you wouldn't say "That doesn't make a discrepancy" in English -- it's always "make a difference", not with some synonym.

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Will-J-Crawford
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 3
  • 61

Yeah, for some reason we always seem to use "create" (or occasionally "produce") with "discrepancy". It's not really a "grammar rule", though, it's a different thing I can't remember the name of. Similar concept to "cliché" but without the negative connotation.

November 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Aleksandra278494

What is the tone of this sentence? The English translation makes it sound like it's an indignant reply to an apology that is not enough. But Duolingo apparently tends to use completely unfitting translations for idioms. What is the case here?

November 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AndiStroh
  • 19
  • 19
  • 7
  • 135

This is a poor sentence to learn anything from. How can one learn the rules of the language when DL pulls a stunt like this?

December 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Phillip534034

People in Germany don't say this. They would be more likely to say: Das macht keinen Unterschied.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JonnaSheya

Is that one of the approved translations?

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SciFiSurfer

The comments in this thread thus far are all fine and wonderful, but the simple truth is duoLingo is testing us not so much on vocabulary, but on ideomatic expressions it never bothers to teach in the first place. That's inexcusable.

February 26, 2019
Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.