"Lo siento, esta mañana mi padre está muy ocupado."

Translation:I'm sorry, this morning my father is very busy.

5 months ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rachel742001

To people asking: manana means both morning and tomorrow. You have to figure it out by using the context. "This tomorrow" doesnt make sense; therefore, it would be "this morning"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Not quite. "La mañana" translates as morning while just "mañana" translates as tomorrow. It is not a case of mañana translating as BOTH morning and tomorrow. That would be totally confusing. Here, "esta" (this) stands in for the "la" as you sort of implied, ballpark wise speaking. I need to give you one thumbs down to negate at least one of all thumbs up that have been given you by people you misinformed.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntwanSell

I'm going what the other guy said.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

I am sure you will see the light eventually. Duolingo has been redesigned to not allow ignorance to forge ahead. In the early days one could make as many as three errors and be able to jump to the next lesson. Too bad you weren't around then. You would do well.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Haha, EugeneTiffany, I gave you a thumbs up for the same reason. Do I remember rightly that "mañana a mañana" means "tomorrow morning?"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

I can't remember for sure but I think you may be right.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AfikMenash

Mañana means tomorrow, no? Here the meaning is "morning". Two negatives meanings for one word?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deb1134
Deb1134
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I know mañana por la mañana means tomorrow morning. I think this example is similar to that one.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonySmith17

As far as I know "Mañana" is Tomorrow while "La mañana" is Morning but this doesn't fit for the current exercise.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Neither "tomorrow" nor "morning" is a negative word.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/10oZENwy

I'm confused with the esta vs. este again...shouldn't it be "este muy ocupado" because este is masculine?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duckwantbread

The 'this' in this sentence is referring to 'morning', therefore you need to match the gender of mañana, not padre.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You need to use accents when they are called for. esta is not the same as está.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madison358260

Dosen't "mañana" mean tommorow?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabella84292

Yes! That is exactly what I thought! Isn't manana tomorrow, not morning?!?!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

The word "la" together with the word, "mañana" as "la mañans" means "morning". It's the combo that does the trick. The two words together. Combined.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lee_2018
Lee_2018
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In english they use to say tomorrow meaning next day and morrow for morning, so yes... mañana is tomorrow and esta mañana means this morning.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Esta mañana" is a literal translation of "this morning," but not one that is used by native Spanish speakers. Basically, "esta mañana" is Spanglish. When studying a language, you have to accept how native speakers use their language. Connotative Spanish usage is found in EugeneTiffany's comments on this page.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Linda, could you provide us with a citation for what you said. How do you know that esta mañana isn't real Spanish? This is a serious question. I would like see anything on the Internet posted by a reputable source that provides the information that "esta mañana" is Spanglish. This would be important to know and understand.

Okay, before I saved this I Googled esta mañana and saw a huge number of links of Spanish pages, and not many English ones. Saw that there was a Spanish speaking TV show called, ESTA MAÑANA. There are lots of web sites about that, in Spanish. Also saw that "esta noche" is also an existing Spanish phrase.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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I think she may have meant "en la mañana". I believe "esta mañana" is a legit Spanish phrase, and I've also seen it everywhere. In a forum on spanishdict, a native speaker said that ' "Some people say Mañana en la mañana" but that's not really the Spanish way. We use "por la mañana, por la tarde, y por la noche" for "in the morning, in the afternoon, and in the evening." ' (her words).

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gax_up

Is it wrong to say: " mi padre es muy ocupado esta manana" ?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

That translates as: My father is very busy this morning.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ana97944

Mañana means tomorrow, but la mañana means morning.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Right. Negated a thumbs down and gave you a lingot.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerekThomp8

Is no one confused as to why occupied is wrong? If anything, wouldn't it be more correct, since occupied is the direct translation of ocupado?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You are correct. But why stop there since "ocupado" can be translated as, busy , occupied , taken , engaged , kept?

The thing is though, since Duolingo is not teaching us translation, all the possible synonyms for any given word in existence are not in the database. And no amount of reports will get them there.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Not true. When enough native speakers go up the reverse tree, as you are doing, and give their corrections and feedback, the database of alternate translations and interpretations will eventually grow. Remember, over two million people are working on this. Besides, who wants to learn a language and not learn the synonyms it contains?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Duro can be translated as: hard , tough , harsh , difficult , stiff , severe , hardcore , strong , stale , stern , stubborn , unkind , intensive , adamant , hard-hearted , hard-boiled
Adverb: rough
Noun: die-hard , hard-liner

So you are expecting Duolingo to eventually support all those words in the lessons?

Good luck with your Pollyanna thinking.

It will never happen, and mainly because Duolingo is not in the business of teaching us translation.

What Duolingo is trying to do here is teach us to think in Spanish like the natives do with all thought about English left behind.

Let me ask you, are you one of those students who like to believe that being fluent in Spanish means being able to do translations in one's head really well? I have news if that be the case. Being fluent does not work like that.

If Duolingo was teaching translation and will one day provide all the different ways to say something in English, why would Duolingo do that? Are we all supposed to be working here to become Professional Translators? Is that it? There could be no other reason.

Note: the "reverse" course has nothing to do with this one. It is for Spanish speaking people who want to learn English and the authors are most likely native Spanish speakers (at least, that's my guess as it makes the most sense), while here they are most likely native English speakers who have studied Spanish for some time. They know English well.

There is no tie or association between the two courses.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulSnatsky

"Ocupado" meant worried in another Duo line, and here it means busy. It should still mean worried because he could be unless we know more about the situation, i.e., he might be very busy worrying.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Rather, preocupado "meant worried in another line."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arnulo
arnulo
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.... my father is really busy. It was accepted.

You can use really to emphasize an adjective.

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/really

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James369084

I am sorry is the same as I'm sorry. I am is more proper then I'm.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaSt5

It just seems ridiculous to me having the same word mean both things

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenniferfa738219

Maria St ....lots of words have more than one meaning...so this it's really not ridiculous

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

María, not to worry. You were misinformed. "Mañana" does not mean BOTH tomorrow and morning as being told it does above. A number of the Duolingo students here are confusing people by providing WMD type of intel..

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I gave you a downvote, EugeneTiffany. Your content is excellent, but reading your misanthropy is such a waste of people's time. Everybody contributes as well as they can.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kynan895568

I see you all over the comment sections here. Im your biggest fan.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/makamakazi

"was"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PavniJagpa

It should be was very busy not is very busy since it is past tense

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ptygj

It's morning. The phone rings. The son answers, and the voice on the other end says, 'Hello young man, is your father free to talk about car insurance?' The son very wisely responds, 'I'm sorry, my father is very busy this morning', and hangs up the phone.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Spanish speakers often use the present tense where English speakers would use a different tense, and that is colloquial usage. What is key here is that "es" is the verb used in this Spanish sentence, and there is no logical reason why the translation can't be word for word.

Connotative interpretations are really only acceptable when the target or source language uses specific colloquialisms that cannot be translated literally and still retain the same meaning. For example, Spanish speakers say "Lo siento" (I feel it) to mean "I'm sorry," and this is colloquial usage in both languages. However, there is just no reason to change "es" to "fue" in this sentence, especially since the speaker could be speaking during the morning in question.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peter.yaco

Its not in proper order. Im sorry, my father is very busy this morning.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Perer, you are using the way English is structured to evaluate Spanish and you need to leave off doing that. Spanish is a different language with its own syntax.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonySmith17

Also accepted. ☺️

4 months ago
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