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"Él fue el campeón durante tres años."

Translation:He was the champion for three years.

4 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Él fue el campeón hace tres años. (Does this mean: He was the champion three years ago.) ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Also, Él fue el campeón de hace tres años (he was the champion from three years ago)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I am not that sure about this, I would actually say: Él es el campeón de hace tres años. Opinions?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Thank you all ^^

@RAMOSRAUL: if it was only to make it easier for Talca, it is fine, but it would be nice that you marked it somehow so people would not get confused. Now, if we talked about a person that won a championship three years ago and is now dead, I would either say: "Él fue el campeón hace tres años" o "él era el campeón de hace tres años", but in this case, I am not sure at all of which one is correct or if they all (your option included) are. Would love to hear other people's inputs!

On the other side, if we were talking about someone who first won a championship three years ago and kept winning ever since, I would go with: "ha sido el campeón desde hace tres años" or "es el campeón desde hace tres años".

In the end I would just say that "de" means in a certain moment and "desde" indicates that something that happened still happens today, as in its action still lasts? (Do not know how to explain this better, sorry!).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

My point was showing Talca, who seemed to be experimenting with preposition variations, the possibility of using "de". This would be as if "tres años" would be treated as a "place" grammatically speaking. "tres años" could be replaced by "juveniles" (category) or "Europa" a blurred place in the north hemisphere. Not changing the verb form is just to make things easier.

Now, I follow you people. He won three years ago, therefore he is still the champion from that competition, whether he won again or not... I understand that you are basing the use of present because he still is. What if he was dead? he is the champion of that competition, that's clear, but he "is" not anymore. I would go for the past then.

If the "being" status is linked to being the champion and there were no more championships (so that he is still the current champion) I would probably go for the present but use "desde" and not "de". Actually I would choose my wording depending on who I am speaking to. I have a friend who is a great boxing fan, but I do not follow fights or events and I could not care less of dates, so he might actually say: "El ganó el campeonato hace tres años y aún lo mantiene" or something along those lines, where what happened when is more clear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elanaknt

I agree Babella. If I were talking about the champion from three years ago, I would probably be doing so now, so I think the present tense sounds better than preterit on this one. But I suppose it could depend on the context...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes, it does :]

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Filjan
Filjan
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English does not require the definite article in front of the word champion. Not in England anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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I "failed" there too. Reporting, as so often!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BharatWalia

Why is "He was the champion during three years. " marked wrong? I thought durante also means during.

2 years ago

[deactivated user]

    I wrote "He was the champion during three years" and was marked wrong. I think this should be correct, and I think that's what the Spanish says. "He was the champion for three years" has a different meaning and would be El fue el campeon por tres anos. To be champion for three years means for 1095 days. To be champion during three years could be as few as 367 days, one day in year one, 365 days in year two and 1 day in year three. This sentence is a mess!

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

    IMO "He was the champion during three years" is not proper English. "Mañana por la mañana" does not mean all of tomorrow morning, but at some time tomorrow morning.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

    i agree, translating "literally" does not work a lot of the time and I think you have to figure what the sentence/phrase is trying to say and interpret it the best way......"he was the champion during three years" is comprehensible but not really "correct" but "he was the champion FOR three years" is the "correct" way to say this......"He was the champion during THOSE three years" would be ok too but I think the spanish sentence would be " el fue el campeon durante ESOS tres anos"....

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

    yo are way over thinking it, seriously. go back to the basics of this sentence and think. stop injecting. logic wins, paraphrasing loses.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Charles218008

    That's what I said and I agree with you.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JimCrew1

    In normal English I would leave out the definite article as in "he was champion for 3 years" but DL wont have it

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jonatanzyl

    In english, when we use "for" or "since", we must use present perfect. The correct translation would be: "He has been the champion for three years.

    Am I right?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/butter-buddha

    I put "he has been..." and was marked wrong. But I learned in English class that 'since' and 'for' in temporal use are markers for the present perfect progressive. Since 'to be' is not used in progressive tenses, it seemed to me "he has been" was correct...

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Pat975426

    Durante is during/not for

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/SkeletonWalk

    If I think of Durante as "for a Duration of" it makes a little more sense in English.

    6 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ShannonSha500852

    Why fue? Why not ERA

    4 months ago