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  5. "¿Cuántos años tienen las señ…

"¿Cuántos años tienen las señoritas?"

Translation:How old are the young ladies?

May 7, 2018

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seanjaxo

This is a question you never ask


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manuna84

You should, if they look 18 or younger


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BerthonyDu

This day and age you do


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ecurb9

Can "senoritas" be translated as "misses" . That was my wrong answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

Every time before this one Duo provided that as the answer. This time I thought is added incredibly odd--so I tried young ladies. And what do you know? It worked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/singingsoprano

no. We don't use "misses" as noun. except as a joke. "Listen here, little miss..."

But no one would use that phrase like that. In the states we would say Young women, young ladies...or even just women.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

Shouldn't that be "Listen here, little missie"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianM.Narine

Why there's no "jóvenes" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahferroin7

Señorita is already a diminutive form of señora. The ‘-ita’ replacing the ‘-a’ is roughly equivalent to the ‘-ette’ suffix that English uses in some cases (borrowed from French).

Depending on the exact context, a diminutive form like this may refer to the thing being talked about being small or in some way lesser than the normal meaning of the word, but when talking about people and animals it usually means that the person or animal being mentioned is young. For example, the Spanish ‘gatito’ is the diminutive of ‘gato’ and means the same thing as the English ‘kitten’, and similarly ‘perrito’ (the diminutive of ‘perro’) is ‘puppy’ (and yes, ‘burrito’ is also ‘little donkey’, though from what I understand that usage is uncommon outside of farming communities).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/remoonline

"How old are the ladies?" is not accepted. The suggested solution is "How old are the kids?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adrianauna

i reported it. How old are the ladies should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

When a Spanish noun has an -ito/ita ending, the English word "little" precedes that Spanish noun's translation. Thus, if you only goal was to communicate, then the translation you propose should be accepted. However, be aware that translating "señoritas" as "young ladies" is preferable, more literal. and hence better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ComradeWeir

Accepted oct 16 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattRTS

Same. That is absolutely ridiculous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Did you report it? Post it there, not here. It's faster and more effective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitchel91

”How old are the ladies" was accepted on 7/26/18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevechuan

Yes, it's silly. I don't think "kids" is appropriate. I also reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcharroux

The popup says señoritas translates to young ladies, ladies or girls. Ladies is now accepted, but girls is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

All the more reason for you to report it. When enough people do, it will be accepted by the program.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Did you report it? Post it there, not here. It's faster and more effective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rahwscoe

Normal speed was singular, slow speed plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koele17

In one exercise senoritas = girls and senoras = ladies confusing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gertrud254715

I talked about this to my Spanish speaking friends. They say back in the day a girl was called "nina" or "chica" until she was old enough to marry--15 then she was called "senorita" until she got married after that of course she was called "senora". I get confused about "los hijos" too. I guess it can be "the sons" or "the children".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/W.Ty.S.

Hmmm. So ... Is the distinction between Senora and Senorita purely marital status or a mix of age and marriage? Has the traditional usage changed to adopt to different societal expectations?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgungRimba

think of Ms. and Mrs. in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaloghTams19

Plural can be heard in the slow mode only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuisAviado

See. Here you translates "las señoritas" as "young ladies" which I used for translation for "Las señoritas tienen vestidos bonitos" and you wanted "young women". Very inconsistent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay84371

how old are the misses (not accepted Dec 1, 2018)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/singingsoprano

shouldn't be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HansEnsink

"How old are the ladies?" was not accepted today (24 September 2018)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kjs_27_blessed

"how many years do the ladies have?" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mel4Jg

The translation of "señoritas" here is "ladies", but when i used "ladies" in the previous translation (These ladies are young) it was supposedly incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gertrud254715

My Spanish speaking friends use "senorita" to indicate "an unmarried woman" and "senora" to address a "married woman".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dELulfR0

June 14 2020 In a previous sentence in this exercise Duo did not accept "young ladies" as a translation for "senoritas" and now in this sentence it does????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Can_Doe

where's the "young" in the spanish sentence? it just says las senoritas, doesn't specify their age or anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libby.Douglas

what's the difference between senoritas and senoras?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manuna84

I guess senorita is "miss" and senora is "mrs." (not yet married and already married respectively)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustafaKor276041

"What are the ages of the young ladies?" rejected.... I am aware in English "How old...." is more common but still..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janusz532259

las señoritas as young ladies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattBraddock3

this is a horrible translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miglaa55

Why not "¿Cuántos años tienen a las señoritas?" Why don't we use "a" after the verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinParr274541

why is duo saying senoritas young?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryAlette

we don't always say young ladies for women who are over 18.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mlaskan

As this refers to senoritas, should it begin with "Cuantas anas..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdNed2

Años means years, and is a masculine noun (always), so you would want "Cuántos años". Anas means a genus of ducks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/newms34

I don't know; it might be important to ask how many ducks the women have.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GMC2013

Why is "young woman" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilylord2

Stalkerish much?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaretHa792435

WHY ARE THEY "young ladies:" not just ladies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathrynN.F

Why is it Cuantos and not Cuantas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaumyaJoshi26

Why specifically young and not just ladies??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarToo1

How old are the ladies still not accepted ( 17 De Enero De 2021)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allie33165

who says "young ladies"? that is ridiculous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manuna84

I've heard old ladies talking like that to young ones.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isabel303668

That statement is considered RUDE in the U.S. except when needed for alcohol, job or voting etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon550118

How is this relevant? We are learning to speak and understand spanish, not how to be polite in the overly sensitive US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdNed2

Keep politics out of it, please.

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