"Un café sin azúcar."

Translation:A coffee without sugar.

6 months ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Un cafe sin azúcar y sin leche es "un café solo" en España.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bird974273

I'm just surprised I can actually read that and understand it lol.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShaneBaraniski

Doesn't Espana refer to the country Spain though?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrevorQuip
TrevorQuip
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they also speak Spanish in Spain fyi... so... also this Spanish is more towards Spain not Mexico, it's why that have the Spain flag instead of the Mexican

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dq3Ci

I think that's what he's saying.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wordsandpages

I think it's okay without the "a" before "coffee", like "coffee without sugar".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T.J.King

Incase you were wondering, I did the research and it looks like a coffee is grammaticaly correct, although it is rare in comparison to a cup of coffee.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yola448704

When we place an order, a coffee may be grammatically correct when it means an order of coffee, one serving of
coffee, one portion of coffee (a cup, a glass):

"May I have a coffee without sugar, please"? (an order)

But: "I always order coffee without sugar" (a statement)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/T.J.King

*in case

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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Yes, of course it's grammatically correct, "coffee" is a noun. The indefinite article "a" + any bare noun is always grammatically correct -- with the minor exception that you'd add an "n" if the noun starts with a vowel sound: "an elephant."

If you mean that it's idiomatic, yes, not only is it idiomatic, it's what most people ordering coffee would say: "I'd like a coffee, please. Large, black."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinguistSherry

Well, technically, it's not grammatically correct because "coffee" is a mass/noncount noun, which doesn't license an indefinite article. However, it is idiomatic as a short form of "a cup of coffee." As an aside, your usage of "bare noun" is incorrect; a bare noun is a noun that does not take a determiner, which means it is not preceded by any article.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan622614

True

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tuba_Chick02

Yeah, agreed

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chief_Pop_Pop

"One coffee no sugar" should be correct right?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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No, "sin" is "without".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaron140397

"No" in this context also means "without," such as "no brakes" and "no self control."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dq3Ci

You're supposed to word it the same way as Duolingo, though.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Your translation is less literal, Chief_Pop_Pop. DL prefers the literal yet natural whenever possible.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaron140397

I have yet to hear someone order "coffee without sugar." I have, however, heard plenty of people say "coffee, no sugar," so I'm not sure how "literal yet natural" applies here.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/syntagma4

Yep, absolutely correct. A lot of phony experts here stay well away from the real world. 'A coffee' BTW started life as proletarian British, then spread like a social disease. It's a good example of dumbing down, of a change of usage that has no purpose but just is. Because.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaron140397

How is "a coffee no sugar" incorrect?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DionHarris4

I was wondering the same thing since the meaning would be the same after translating it to English

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ricky269122

Through the the tongue of a native english speaker,this sentence does not seem natural.So I mean, why not just let this one go duoling?The one a in the sentence should not make the whole thing wrong.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeannaJohn4

Yes "un" is listed but in English we don't always say "A" we just say "get me coffee, with out sugar" or "I want coffee, no sugar"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaron140397

I have yet to hear anyone request coffee "without sugar." Its stilted and awkward.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helen940450

A blabk coffee

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helen940450

Er meant a black coffee

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlHZdv1

no sugar and without sugar mean the same thing. Should be accepted

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamaldutta1957

Is it Un cafe or Una cafe? Earlier exercise had Una. How to decide?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Fast_Wind

You would use the masculine un rather than the feminine una, as the noun cafe is masculine.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chema_dicit

Yes. I say "un café" or "una TAZA de café". Café is masculine, taza feminine

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IamJustintime
IamJustintime
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Is ,,sin'' used in the same way as ,,bez'' in Polish or ,,без'' in Russian? Thanks in Advance :)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yola448704

Yes it is:

Un cafe sin azucar - Kawa bez cukru

Un cafe sin azucar, por favor - Proszę o kawę bez cukru

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabijaLuko

Can someone explain to me how to use different letters in different words such as áúíóé, please?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Edmund541410

I typed "A sugarless coffee" but its still wrong. Can they add more possibilities?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DionHarris4

I think one issue I've found is 'sin' meaning 'without' rather than no. I think duoling is going with the literal translations even though saying 'A coffee, no sugar' is completely acceptable in English (an possibly other languages)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian_Swann

how do you know if "sin" it is with or without

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShaneBaraniski

"sin" literally means "without", and "con" translates into the word "with". "Con o sin" translates into "with or without".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe644866

I put "a coffee no sugar" which was flagged incorrect. But in English we don't say without, we no.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToniSander

coffee is the same as cafe'

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nixolbor

could "a coffee with no sugar" or "no sugar with th e coffe" work also?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nixolbor

the*

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliftonE.K

I wrote "coffee without sugar" and it was wrong.

1 week ago
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