"Tenemos tres millones de dólares."

Translation:We have three million dollars.

May 9, 2018

29 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnAmiry

Is this a sentence I will be using often?

January 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sirena.N

hope so

April 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan145548

Pro'ly not.

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBenzel

Why is "de" necessary? Couldn't you say Tenemos tres millones dólares?

May 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elvolcanchapin

The word 'Millón' is a noun. When you want to use a noun to describe the quantity another noun like this, you use the word 'of'.

i.e. I have 3 buckets OF fish.

It's the same thing, only English has this weird exception to that rule with 'million'. Spanish does not. Of=de.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/secret_sAndwich

English tends to treat numbers as adjectives, so we say things like "There are 3 dogs" or "I have $3,000" as opposed to "I'd like 4 of hot dogs, please" or "Give me 3 million of dollars or the cat gets it!"

Numerous counterexamples exist where numbers can be nouns, but they are mainly expressed as adjectives.

December 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devburke

Does this apply to "mil" also?

July 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

No, that applies only ot millón and the higher numbers.

  • mil dólares - a thousand dollars
  • diez mil dólares - ten thousand dollars
  • cien mil dólares - a hundred thousand dollars
  • un millón de dólares - a million dollars
  • diez millones de dólares - ten million dollars
July 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renata494774

Why is a million different than any other number? You can say "tengo tres dólares"?

December 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It's simply the way it is. There's no real reason to it. Millón, millardo, billón and so on are nouns which cannot be used as numerals, and the smaller numbers can.

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

"We have $3,000,000" should be accepted.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

I guess... but it is simpler just to type out the words.

July 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

Tried "$3 million". Every time before this one Duo has accepted a dollar sign and the number. Why change that pattern now?

August 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

It simply hasn't been added to the accepted list yet. Report it if you want to.

September 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serge-Del-Faro

In Mexico a "$3,000,000" price tag means 3,000,000 pesos.

April 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teja313

Lol, I doubt it if I use this sentence in real life :D

August 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joel926356

Sometimes "de" is required for the correct answer and sometimes it's marked wrong. Why?

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

If the two words you are connecting are both nouns use 'de'. If the second one is an adjective don't.

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mayerhofer1

Ok de is about according to the drop down. Why is it not in the translation?

May 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

De can translate as "about", but not here. How would you even incorporate that in this sentence?

You should avoid trying to directly translate prepositions. They always have to be viewed in context. Here it's used because millón and dólar are both nouns, but in English they aren't, so the de remains untranslated.

May 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcusfy

English version: Is the plural "s" of dollars really necessary?

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devburke

In English? Yeah, you need the "s" on dollars. Saying "We have three million dollar," wouldn't make sense. If there's more than one, it's plural, and 3 million is a lot more than one.

Apologies if I misunderstood the question.

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcusfy

Thanks! You understood the question perfectly. I'm not a native speaker. Still the question remains: Why is it the "one-million-dollar-question"?

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

English has the fun ability to mash two nouns together and combine them into a single "complex noun". "Window" and "glass" become "window glass" and so on.

You usually get told that "the first word is an adjective" in these combinations, but you don't usually get told what that means. Here's what it means: English adjectives don't have plural forms. You have a "student council" even though it's intended for multiple students, and at a "book sale" they sell multiple books.

This lack of a plural form becomes blatantly obvious when you add a specific number. If a steak costs nine dollars, it'll be a "nine-dollar steak", and your "eight-hour job" makes you work for eight hours.

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

Lol... you beat me to by seconds RyagonIV. I'm glad though because your answer is perfect. I couldn't have done better. A lingot for you! (even though I know you've probably got thousands like me).

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcusfy

Gorgeous explanation!

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael307373

Yep. Ryagon is know for such things.

July 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James369084

No matter how hard I tried and how often I slowed this down I could not understand her.

August 11, 2019
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