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"My husband is always worried."

Translation:Mi esposo siempre está preocupado.

May 10, 2018

85 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PansyPurple

Surely if he is always worried, then this is a permanent condition (es) not temporary (esta)?? In any case esta was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank120700

Don't think of ser as "permanent" and estoy as "temporary." This is sometimes true, but is more a rule of thumb rather than a fact. For example, the location of a building uses estar when though it's more or less "permanent" and occupations use ser even though that could change tomorrow.

Emotions use "estar."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LowlandPhilomath

To expand on that, a more extensive rule of thumb (that will be correct more often) is to remember "e-Doctor" & "Place".

Ser is "e-Doctor": Event; description; occupation; condition; time; origin; relationship.

Estar is "Place": Position, location, action, condition, emotion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoldieLox4

Can you explain how the "condition" is different in eDoctor and Place?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danishviking88

Hello, sorry I know this is 4 months late, but I did a little research, the C in e-Doctor is supposed to be Characteristics, not condition. The original poster just made a mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sayanti13

This is amazing! Muchas gracias!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneFon1

Right. It helps me to remember this by re-stating sentences using the word "feels" instead of "is" -- My husband always feels worried. Or she feels ill. Or I feel tired. The weird one for me is hungry/thirsty. Why do we say "Tengo hambre" (I have hunger) vs. "Estoy hambre?" I'm guessing there's probably an interesting answer to it that I could Google... :o)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/terapeuta16

Perhaps because hunger and thirst are involuntary, natural instincts common to every individual, whereas the expression of emotions (that is, feelings) is under the control of each individual.

For example and another way to look at it is, my body signals to my brain that I have thirst and/or hunger. I decide in that situation how I'm going to emote or feel - angry, sad, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/accessive

SuzanneFon1 - That's an ok way to think of it, just don't confuse yourself with the actual usage of "Feeling" in Spanish..... while "Está" IS used to convey emotions, the word for saying someone is "feeling" a particular way is different. For example, someone old may be feeling young at the time....

Sentir = To Feel

Yo Siento Tú Sientes El/Ella/Usted Siente

etc.... here's a link with more info.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/sentir-spanish-conjugation-present-tense-subjunctive.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJWphd

Might go back to Latin? Germans also "have hunger" and "have thirst."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom705072

The Czechs / Slovaks too:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaretSa1610

Maltese language too. ' I have hunger / thirst' (if one translates word for word)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PansyPurple

Frank120700 Ah yes, I never thought about location of buildings etc. Thanks for the info - emotions = estar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark359873

Interesting. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/accessive

PansyPurple - ESTÁ & ESTA are different words.

Está is the conjugation of "ESTAR" (To Be).

Esta is the femenine version of "ESTE" which means "This".

example - La mujer está enferma esta mañana.

(The woman is sick sick this morning.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larkinbb

THAT IS SO HELPFUL! Thank You :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJWphd

"always" here is a bit of an exaggeration, or hyperbole. The state of being worried is itself temporary; the speaker is slightly exaggerating that this state, which should be temporary, seems to be occurring at a far too regular frequency.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wghj6cQb

That's funny because I used es and was marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoashmo

Did you out esta or está?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vilasinisu

Yes. I was wondering about the same!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scooter188438

Why is it esta, then preocupado? Why is it switching from fem to masc mid sentence?


[deactivated user]

    This is because está in this sentence is the he/she/it conjugation of estar and has no gender because it is a verb.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison944678

    They havent shown us marido yet, thats why. Stick to the words we have learned and you wont go astray. Marido comes up in later lessons. Im here for a cracked lesson to practice. Specifically, marido=husband and esposo=spouse.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

    "marido" is accepted, although it may not have been 2 years ago when Derek's comment was posted.


    [deactivated user]

      You can think of the reason to use "estar" in this way. Emotions are never really permanent. Someone may be worried or angry a lot of the time, but occasionally they feel something else. Their emotions do not define their character, so emotions aren't expressed using as strict of a verb.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamratMalik

      I wrote " Siempre mi esposo está preocupado". And it marked as correct. Can someone explain about the sentence structure here?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_Anaximenes

      Spanish sentence structure has some flexibility in places that English doesn't. This is one of those places. "Siempre" can go at the beginning, before the verb, after the verb, or at the end, and it still works.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/priyeshwad

      Would like to know the same.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EilaGoss

      Again why not mi esposo esta preocupado siempre - as often the adjective seems to follow the noun?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donescondida

      A typo I said Marido


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abhinav948878

      mi esposo está siempre preocupado.

      Is this wrong? Why, Why not?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trumaine7

      "Mi esposo esta siempre preocupado" why's this wrong


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkDavies2

      It's está (with accent) not está. Esta is the feminine "this".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkDavies2

      Oh for God's sake... Autocorrect hell! Meant to say "... not esta"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris474161

      I think it's wrong because you can't split up "esta'" and "preocupado." In spanish it's kind of the same as putting it in between "mi" and "esposo," you can't break them up. you could put siempre anywhere else tho! (I'm writing this for future people, and also someone correct me if I'm wrong please)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trumaine7

      Why's "Mi esposo es siempre preocupado" wrong


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John93649

      I used es instead of esta(with the accent) for the verb is. Please explain why it was marked wrong, thanks.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CainaenMcG

      If the subject is masculine why is it esta and not este?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donescondida

      I used marino but it was marked wrong , any ideas why ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerryGriff

      I thought native Spanish speakers put words like "always", "yet", etc at the start of a sentence ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marlene939271

      Why estas and not esta


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susan409307

      I answered marido for husband. Why was it marked wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/g7110

      There is a problem with this question...it will not light up blue on the right answer so forces me to answer wrong...please could you fix it as when i have to go back and repeat it the same thing happens and will not sllow me to finish the section without quiting. Thank you for your support.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayush273811

      Why esta why not este


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mott86

      Because it's está, a form of the verb "estar" (to be).

      Esta/este means this (in fem and masc form)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaJuani206232

      I have trouble knowing when a verb ends in which vowel. I thought verbs ending in o were reserved for first person singular, so I wrote mi espose siempre preocupade yet I got this one wrong, it should be preocupado. Are there more tricks for this? Or is there a better source of conjugations and vocabulary than my Barron's guides?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

      Regular verbs do conjugate as you suggest but preocupado is not a verb, it is a masculine singular adjective to agree with esposo

      https://www.spanishdict.com/ is a good site for checking words and conjugations.

      EDIT:
      The verb in this sentence is "is" = está


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PapillonCharmant

      why does the placement of "esta" matter?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

      It's by convention so that the listener correctly understands the speaker, just like English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saswatomaj

      Can any one tell me why is "Mi marido ya está preocupado" incirrect?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

      ya = "already" not "always"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanneShee1

      2 questions: what do you mean by e-doctor, LowlandPhilomath? Your estar tip is terrific. Why isn't it Mi esposo siempre está preocuparse?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

      As LowlandPhilomath has not responded yet, allow me to try to help:

      "e-doctor" is a mnemonic for the first letter of the words that follow which aim to show when to use ser

      "place" is a mnemonic for the first letter of the words that follow which aim to show when to use estar

      It's not preocuparse because that means "to worry" (verb) not "worried" (adjective)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john137164

      Why can't you write 'está siempre preocupado'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

      "Mi esposo está siempre preocupado." is an accepted alternative


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeirdreBak

      Did anyone else struggle with this one? 'Mi esposo siempre está preocupado' sounded a bit ungrammatical. But, 'Mi esposo siempre es preocupado' seemed a bit hyperbolic, as if his worry were an innate quality such as height or skin color.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

      "estar" is always used for emotions.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lafoldes

      How strict is the word order ? Is there any difference between

      siempre está preocupado and está siempre preocupado ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrakharPor1

      where to use preocupada or preocupado? i am not able to understand the use of word form ....a or .....o.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffreyNub

      Husband is masculine, therefor it is preocupado


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GSinCB

      But surely if someone is permanently, angry, bored, etc. It is part of their permanent character and Ser would be used? Eg. If I'm only bored today, then estar should be used. However, if boredom is a permanent condition, then Ser? I'm no expert, but this is how I understand Ser v Estar?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tarynjoel

      I wrote esposo the first time and duolingo marked me wrong with a correction of espose, so i wrote espose and it marked me wrong w esposo, WHATS GOING ON HERE


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roberto452407

      He is always worried because he married you!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EMT890790

      Not right? But my answer was the same as The answer.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon618664

      My font is too large and hides the question


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoyMahesh1234

      Why we cant say mi esposo está simpre preocupado


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reidwinchester

      I typed in "mi esposo está siempre preocupado" and it was also marked correct. Is there any huge difference between these two?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonetteEmm

      Why is siempre before está please?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mott86

      adverb before verb


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheArtist1

      Why can’t the esta precede siempre? Ie mi esposo está siempre preocupado?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pdallen1970

      I would assume I was familiar with my husband, so why not "Mi esposo siempre estás preocupado"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mott86

      She is talking about her husband to somebody else, in the third person.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athreyakb

      Mi esposo is male so should it be este and not esta


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mott86

      No, está is a conjugated form of the verb "estar" (to be). Este and esta mean 'this'.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashik210617

      why we dont make it a reflexive verb??

      it should be


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mott86

      You'd use the reflexive pronoun "se" (himself) if the sentence included the verb "sentir" (to feel)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharonsampon

      I can't seem to get "estas and esta" help me with a straight forward explanation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peggy7036

      Dit is juist?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgiaNirvana

      'Mi esposo está siempre preocupado' got marked correctly for me?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mott86

      the adverb (always) comes before the verb (is)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeloVela

      Does "ansioso" not work in this sentence?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeeWalker1

      My answer matched the correct answer but came up as wrong?

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