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  5. "I don't read a lot."

"I don't read a lot."

Translation:Yo no leo mucho.

May 10, 2018

84 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wallace796602

What the difference between leo leer and lees. ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Learpholla

"leer" is the infinitive form ("to read").
"(yo) leo" = "I read" (1st person singular, present)
"(tú) lees" = "you read" (2nd person singular, present)

See, for example, this page for more information on the conjugation of leer and here for an overview of present tense forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/papa659037

Leerpholla.... You explained this very simple and clear. Thank you for that. I read your post and instantly understood. I asked family members that spoke spanish to explain it to me and they confused me even more. Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia270181

Well papa659037 i like you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ATHARV819

Lmfao that sounds so sexual


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaysAndMints81

What is the third person of read?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

in English: "reads"
in Spanish: lee

At least this is 3rd person singular. Plural would be "read" resp. "leen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l_jezkova07

Él/ella/usted lee


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickOsgood

Thanks that was very helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oris857031

Would it be the same for 1st person,plurel number and 2nd person,plurel number ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

No. They have different forms.
we read = (nosotros) leemos
you (plural) read = (vosotros) leéis (in Spanish Spanish; in Latin American Spanish: (ustedes) leen).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MzOthman

I too was wondering the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rajlaxmi-_-

What is difference in leo and leer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

"leer" is the infinitive ("(to) read"), "leo" is the conjugated 1st person singular present form ("(I) read").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashleygirl24

So then why is it "mucho gusto" for "nice to meet you?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

much pleasure


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FpES

Can I leave out the yo and just say No leo mucho?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnieMaybe1

So whats the difference between muy and mucho?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

"mucho" is "much", "muy" is "very"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nevaeh571987

Muy is very and mucho is a alot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mackenzie37482

False I read a lot I'm a bookworm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WeRMeant2Thrive

@Learpholla
Thank you for all of the information you have shared.

Will you please provide the website addresses for the information you suggested we read when you wrote THIS PAGE and HERE ?

I am sorry to ask. I have not been able to open either of the links.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Learpholla

Hi. In my comment from a few months ago:

"this page" links to http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-spanish-verb-leer.html

"here" links to https://www.spanish.cl/grammar-rules/present-tense.htm

[I just tested the links, and they do still work.]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeTha3rd

Why doesn't "Yo leo no mucho" workkkkk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce768614

The "no" must go before the verb, "leo".

In Spanish, to negate a sentence you must either put "no" or another negative word like "nunca" or "tampoco" etc. before the verb. Fairly often people use double negatives in Spanish. For example: "Yo no leo nunca." = "I never read."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather926175

when do I use Yo no leo mucho and when Yo no lei mucho? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

"leo" - present tense.
"leí" - past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather926175

Thanks Jim. Got it! Heathers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JovanniCam4

i looked it up on the internet, it was a completely different word man dude sir.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia270181

I don't read that tall tale a lot either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Issapa

I spelled mucho like mocho


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosemaryAl713188

Why is 'yo' required when "leo" means 'I read'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diego617377

You can omit "yo" and it is still correct, in fact, Spanish native speaker almost always omit the pronouns when they speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veronica395707

Confused over leer and leo...both mean read


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

"leer" is the infinitive ("(to) read"), "leo" means "(I) read" (1st person singular).
Those are two different words. Unfortunately English uses the same word for them, but that's not so in many other languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/berlin625

Muy Gracias @learpholla


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/berlin625

Thanks learpholla!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MRant4

I love how you can access comments for more clarity in this app! Thanks to all who contribute!


[deactivated user]

    For "I am not a student' we say it as " Yo soy no estudente ". But here 'no' comes first before leo. Why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    It is "Yo no soy estudente" as well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vishnu0611

    What is the difference between leo and estudio


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    Same as between "I read" and "I study" in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patty886103

    Is leer not read


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    "leer" is the infinitive, "(to) read". But "I read" is "leo".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/max387675

    I do not read a lot/Yo no leo mucho


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radhakrish283358

    What is the difference between leo and leer


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    "leer" is the infinitive ("(to) read"). "leo" is the conjugated 1st person singular present tense form ("(I) read").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamie74770

    Whats the difference between the different ways to spell read?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Learpholla

    different ways to spell read

    Do you mean the various Spanish words that correspond to the English 'read' (pronounced /riːd/ 'reed')?

    A single English verb form can have several uses:

    • (to) read — infinitive
    • read — imperative
    • I/you/we/they read — present tense, all persons except 3rd singular (reads)

    Spanish verbs have many more distinct forms in their conjugation than English verbs. So you will frequently find that a given English form has several corresponding forms in Spanish.

    See, for example:


    NOTE: In the case of read, since it can be a past form (pronounced /rɛd/ 'red'), there are also those corresponding Spanish forms to bear in mind.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamie74770

    Sorry yeh, i know now, Leer - to read Leo - I read Lees - you read


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    There are no different ways to spell "read".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BellaLopez800414

    I I agree with Wallace here what is the difference?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

    The answer was provided by Learpholla


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olivia950231

    This is a easy question


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SocJul

    I write the correct answer and you said that its wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/onceady

    Does anyone know why you can't say "Yo no leo mucha"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    The adverb "much" is always "mucho".
    Forms like "mucha" only appear in the adjective "mucho".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/onceady

    Ohh, I see. So "mucha" is only used for nouns.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Learpholla

    Forms like "mucha" only appear in the adjective "mucho".

    fehrerdef, as well as being an adverb and an adjective, mucho can also be used as a pronoun (see RAE, mucho §5). As such, it has feminine and plural forms.

    So, in a context where the pronoun mucho refers to a noun that is other than masculine singular (e.g. ciencia ficción, periódicos, revistas) then an expression such as 'no leo mucha' could be grammatical.:

    Me encanta la novela negra, pero no leo mucha porque leo muy variado... — El bibliotecario blog, comment by Dorotea Hyde

    And in the plural:

    ..la cantidad de novelas que se ambientan en Barcelona. Últimamente, leo muchas... — Cuéntame una historia blog, comment by Rosa Berros Canuria


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    You are of course right. But I don't think that will help the one who posted the original question, because in the sentences you quote the translation of "mucho/a/os/as" is not "much / a lot", but something like "many of them" or "much of it" in reference to something mentioned before. There is no such context given here.

    So, yes. You can find such a sentence in literature and it is grammatical. But this construction has not yet been taught by Duolingo and it would only complicate things for the basic learner to include it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/onceady

    Shucks, thanks! :) It's cool to know that you can refer back to antecedents like that, though it wasn't what I was asking back then.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pranjali218264

    Why is it not Mucho Leo???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

    Note: I deleted a comment I made incorrectly suggesting that "mucho" was an adjective here. Of course, as @fehrerdef pointed out, it is an adverb in this sentence.

    In Spanish, adverbs that modify verbs usually come after the verb they modify.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    Sorry to step in again. Adverbs that modify verbs are in many cases placed in front of the verb, like e.g. in "I always read" = "(yo) siempre leo".
    I think this is the reason why this question was raised at all, because "mucho" seems to behave differently here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim8161

    Hmm - Span¡shD!ct has let me down?

    • An adverb usually comes after the verb it modifies.

    Ref: https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-adverbs

    Other references suggest either before or after the verb (and with some variations, especially with adverbs that affect the whole sentence, such as "always"), so you are right. 👍 🙂


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    SpanishDict is mostly ok. There are lots of examples where the adverb is placed after the verb. But there are a lot that have to be placed in front.
    So matters are more complicated than I thought. It might be dangerous to say "usually" for either case.
    Unfortunately SpanishDict didn't give examples for all the adverbs it lists. E.g. "siempre", "nunca" and, most prominent. "no" must be placed in front. Others, like "mucho" or "bien" must be placed after the verb. And others, like "a veces" or "a menudo" are best put at the end or the very beginning of the sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/w6mMZZYj

    Haha i just woke up and wrote yo no muy leer lol lol


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sierra867414

    I just want to ask sth. What about he/she reads what would the answer be Ella /el _


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    "lee".
    And "he" is "él" (with an accent). "el" means "the".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m_ym

    U should add this in the course while we go through it

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