"Élnoquierelevantarseantesdelasocho."

Translation:He does not want to get up before eight.

8 months ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/wO1667m3

I do wish this course still introduced the grammar of reflexives properly, instead of just throwing them in here and there

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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I try to think of myself as a three-year-old learning to speak the language around me. I doubt that child could read/comprehend a "proper" introduction of anything, would have to pick up what s/he hears "here and there." For that reason, I appreciate the way DL does it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leckothegecko

Shouldn't "wake up" also work?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nottm98
Nottm98
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Wake up is "Despertarse".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF
0KyfnlOF
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I know what you are getting at, but wake up & get up are different. You might stay in bed for some time before getting up.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FernandoCP.
FernandoCP.
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I think so. "Levantarse" and "despertarse" are normally used to say the same.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lance836120

Why leventarse and not levantar?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRachael

It's a reflexive verb - if a person is getting themselves up, it's levantarse. If one is raising or lifting an object, levantar works

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Differently expressed, levantar means "to lift", and you always need to specify what you lift, even if it's yourself.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RickK16

I thought "doesn't like to get up" should also be correct.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Not precisely, even though those sentences express similar feelings. But I would recommend using a gustar construction for "doesn't like to".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry426988

Nothing in the sentence indicates that it is eight AM .... Could be PM .... Could be just 8.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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Yeah. I put "[...]before 8:00" and was marked wrong, and corrected to "before 8 am". However, if you type the whole word "eight", it's accepted.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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Eight o'clock is also accepted.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pdp420
Pdp420
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Why- "de las ocho" not "de los ocho"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morne
Morne
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I'm not certain, but perhaps because it is referring to the hour, "hora", which is feminine?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRachael

Correct!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielDeik

Because you included it, the 'de' is with the 'antes de' (before). For 'at eight o'clock' one would say, 'a las ocho'. Not your question, but might help someone.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NapoLeon866729

Who does?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EchoZulu70

can we use 'se levanta' here?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You can say "se quiere levantar" if you want, but you can't split the verbs with a pronoun.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babak901306

Get up is same as wake up in english

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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When I wake up, I open my eyes and become conscious. When I get up, I actually leave my bed. Since getting a smartphone, the time difference between those two actions has been getting quite large.

3 days ago
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