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  5. "Ella busca quince pesos en l…

"Ella busca quince pesos en la cartera."

Translation:She is looking for fifteen pesos in the purse.

May 14, 2018

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sky181743

"the purse" isn't natural. It would almost always be "her purse", unless it was a stolen purse (for example), or some other unusual situation where the purse belonged to someone other than her.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmineHadji1

Yes, it is unnatural, but so is the use of la cartera in Spanish. It would be su cartera, unless it's an unusual situation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alezzzix

It's not unnatural at all in Spanish to say la cartera, it is the most natural way of saying this actually, Spanish doesn't use possessive adjectives as much as English does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doc0048

In Italy as well we say "nella borsa" (en la cartera), and not "nella sua borsa", (en la su cartera), unless the context needs that. In this sentence it's just "nella borsa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinFines

I just wish we could have a proper Spanish as in from Spain, translation that I registered for, rather Mexican where I am unlikely to travel to from UK


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngieKing6

Haha and I wish the opposite. I'm far more likely to go to Mexico than Spain. It would be nice if there were two separate courses, or at least if there are regional variations, if that could be made clear within the lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandiWL

AngieKing in case you still want to know, cartera is wallet in Mexico and bolsa is purse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bontano

Try to get over the idea that there's a "proper" Spanish. There's a current Spanish in Spain, and a current Spanish in Latin America (and regional variations within Latin America, and there probably are in Spain, too.) Aspects of the Spanish in Spain today are likely different than they were at the time of American colonisation. Everything's always changing everywhere.

It would be nice if Duolingo had separate streams for Spanish and Latin America, though. Before the internet, most language training programs (which came on phonograph records and later on cassettes and CDs) had separate versions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tommymair1

I live in uk and planing trip to México .. So ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

I was wondering if this construction without the personal pronoun is similar to the way Spanish uses the definite article rather than possessive pronoun for body parts. For instance, "I broke my leg" = me rompí la pierna. It would be incorrect to use mi pierna, but is a common mistake for people acquiring Spanish whose first language uses the personal pronoun in that phrase. Long story short, I think la cartera here is idiomatic and translates as "her purse" in English which prefers the pronoun (although as others have pointed out "the purse" here does work). But the question here is how Spanish works. Whether some forms of Spanish (e.g., Argentina, El Salvador, Mexico) use the pronoun in this case is beyond my knowledge and experience. I would wonder if the pronoun is used in some Spanish speaking countries or regions whether it is from interference from English. But as always I defer to native speakers of Spanish to let us know what is idiomatic in their region. In my region of US English, we "get ready" or "are about to" go some place, but in some parts of the southern US they "are fixin" to go some place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

I believe they are related, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adamgittins

When caught, the thief was looking in the purse. Perfectly sound English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1rjU9yOO

So "la mano" would be "her hand", but "la cartera" is "the purse", not "her purse"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

It's different with body parts -yup, that's the only exception of which I am aware.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nuckley

"her purse" is an accepted translation here, and a number of people here argue that it's actually the more common understanding of "la caretera" in a construction like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowith

I think i read an explanation that in a sentence like this if you said "su cartera" a native speaker would wonder why you said that because it is obvious that it is her purse (ella), so that is why you say "la cartera". Then in English, you would translate "her purse".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alezzzix

You are correct. 'Her purse' is the best translation in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phelicks

I assumed it was the same as lavarse las manos - the possessive understood


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocitos

It seems like a waste of time to overthink this one. It's pretty simple. It might not be what is "natural" to say, or what someone "would say". "la cartera" = "the purse". It could be la casa, la sala, el carro, el cuarto. They're not telling you a story, they're just giving you a sentence to translate. If you got it wrong, don't worry, you'll get another chance to get it right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/re.tyara

why not "she look for fifteen pesos"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

She looks for.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

"looks for" can work, too, but idiomatically more words would help the sentence. "She is looking for" means she's doing it right now. "She looks for" can refer to a tendency: everyday she looks for the pesos. Even right now she's looking for them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardForan

Ok and what about using pesos, i taught that went away in the 90s, do spanish still use pesos as a type of slang when talking about euros , or in this case perhaps cent. or is it just duo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

Pesos are the unit of currency in Mexico.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walter833699

Colombia uses pesos, but 1 U.S. penny is worth about 33 Colombian pesos. Spain uses the Euro as its currency.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherine18139

I took high school and collge spanish, we always learned, any action with "-ing" Spanish was "estar + -ando, iendo, etc." But I suppose there are other ways depending on the translation. Always learning something new.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MineBoomUS

I’m assuming pesos are a standard currency in some Spanish-speaking countries. Good to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tani2207

Which place has pesos as their national currency because in Europe it is euro not pesos. I dont know if this is an American thing like soccer and football.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocitos

Currently, eight countries use the peso.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walter833699

But, they do not use the same peso. For example 1 Colombian peso is not worth the same as 1 Mexican peso or 1 Argentine peso. So, you need to say which peso you are talking about. They are not the same just because they use the word, "peso". It is the same for dollars. There are Canadian and US dollars, but they are have different values and the bills and coins do not look the same. There are also Cayman dollars and Bahamian dollars, but they have nothing to do with US dollars or Canadian dollars.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catejwall

What are 'pesos'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

The peso is the unit of currency in Mexico, just like the dollar is the unit of currency in the USA.

https://www.x-rates.com/calculator/?from=USD&to=MXN&amount=1


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TurtleTrend

how would you say "she looks for 15 dollars in the purse"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucdeVylde

cartera is wallet also , bolso is purse


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GailL.Blac

In English wouldn't she be looking for dollars $15 in her purse and not pesos


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

No, translating the language does not convert the currency.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertTard2

Wouldn't one usually write 'her purse' and not 'the purse' in this situation? i.e., Ella busca quince pesos en su cartera.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

No. Different language, different grammar rules. In Spanish, if "whose" is clear, there is no need for explicit possessives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elaine95040

I put 15 why refused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

If you wrote "Ella busca 15 pesos en la cartera", it marked you wrong because you completely defeated the purpose of the lesson, which is to teach you the number in Spanish, which is "quince".

If you tried to write "She is looking for 15 pesos in the purse" and it marked you wrong, you very likely had an error somewhere in the sentence. Next time, copy and paste the full text of your answer so we can see what's going on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Molly389006

How do u know wether it means is looking or looks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

Whichever is more appropriate in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raymond79558

It says type what you hear in spanish, but says that's wrong,so i type it in english and it says that's also wrong.just cost me three hearts for trying to give the correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BibliophileJill

I typed the exact same answer and still it is analyzed as wrong answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.JegdQa

How can i know whether it is "she is looking for or she looks for"like is there no tenses in Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felicity359602

It could indeed be translated as either "she looks" or "she is looking". If the Spanish really wanted to emphasize that she is looking in the purse right now, there's a tense called present progressive that looks like "ella está buscando". Spanish does have many different tenses but doesn't always use them exactly the same way English does, e.g. English uses the present-progressive ("she is looking") more freely than Spanish does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyler617793

it marked " her purse" wrong. so are we to assume she is a criminal and stole the purse and that's why she's looking for fifteen dollars?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheriNicole

In "the" purse doesn't sound right. It sounds like Ella is a thief!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

Don't try to impose English-language sensibilities onto Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmilieCard11

pesos is spanish. the accepted answer is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

Pesos are pesos. Pesos are not dollars. As a unit of currency, it does not get translated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonRawling

Why doesn't "en" mean "for" in the instance, implying she is going to buy the purse?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

"En" is never used to mean "for". Where is she looking for the money? In the purse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akshay756121

Mine was correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaAbuelaLagos

I though she was looking for money to pay for the purse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

That would be Ella busca quince pesos para pagar la cartera.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alikur

why not she look for 25 pesos in the purse


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felicity359602

First of all, because quince means 15, not 25. Secondly "she look" is not correct in English; it's "she looks" (or "she is looking").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keeks331118

i thought pesos were dollars


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2665

No. Every country has its own unit of currency. Pesos are pesos. American dollars are American dollars. Yen are yen. There is an exchange rate. They are not synonymous.

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