https://www.duolingo.com/Bonantagulo

Learning Spanish as a heritage speaker

I haven't been able to find/google an adequate answer for this. I was raised in a Spanish speaking household (My parents are from Mexico). I mainly only spoke Spanish at home or with family. In school, it was English only. I never actually learned Spanish formally, much to the detriment of my speaking ability. I was wondering if there are any resources that are specifically designed for people in similar situations.

6 months ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
lizsue
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https://heritagespanish.coerll.utexas.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/SPN-604.docx is a syllabus for a Heritage Spanish class, and lists the textbook Conectando con mi herencia: Lengua y cultura. Kendall Hunt, 2015.
ISBN 978-1-4652-9360-2.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria_321-

My local university has Spanish language courses specifically for heritage speakers. You could google "Oregon State University, in Corvallis Oregon" to get a list of their current classes. Then ask your closest Community College or University if they have similar classes. It's a completely different focus from what I understand and very useful for heritage speakers.

Good luck!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I'm in Tucson, I know the local community college has courses for heritage Spanish speakers. I'd also try just reading novels in Spanish and watching Spanish language TV a lot, if you imitate the language on those, and it will come naturally to do so, your spoken Spanish should improve. Buena Suerte.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeCreative__
BeCreative__
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I'll just tag along to the trend saying my University had a course that was in part based for heritage speakers as well. I mean, what you missed out on was grammar, writing, and reading, but you should get a lot of communicative stuff and be able to talk because you were immersed. So, if you want to learn Spanish and improve those abilities, do stuff that helps with it: Duolingo, read, write, go see a tutor, if you have the attention span, start looking at some grammar, if you are a college student and you have the option, look into a course, if you are not a college student but out of secondary school look into a course, if you are in secondary school get in a course, and lots more etc.

Think about what you want to do and like in terms of getting better, and you can go keeping in mind you will get a big boost from being a heritage speaker :D

Buenas suerte :D

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
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I'd say "no". How much Spanish you know? If you have a good level in conversation but no knowledge in writing, maybe you need a course for reading and writing Spanish rather Spanish language classes. If you need information about grammar (rules for conjugation and so on), maybe it could be helpful a course of Spanish grammar either for L1 or L2 speakers.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
lizsue
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Some schools actually have "Heritage Spanish" courses for students in Bonantagulo's situation.

Bonantagulo, I'd recommend doing a web search for "Heritage Spanish" and "syllabus," then seeing what's required in those courses. Maybe they'll list books that are available outside the courses too, and you could get the books from a library or bookstore?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
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You're right, thanks.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chavela382611

This is something I struggle with as well. Mis abuelos spoke spanish with me as a child. Unfortunately, my parents did not, and when they passed, I lost a lot of the spanish that I once spoke fluently. I recently became aquainted with some relatives in Mexico and am doing my best to refresh my knowledge. Unfortunately, I find many words are different. Not sure if it is dialect or not. Worried that I am setting myself back learning a formal version of the language.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Mexican Spanish uses many words differently than the Spanish you learn in books. And then there are the regional dialects. When you have trouble, just ask. People usually know the "correct" word (standard Mexican Spanish). They may NOT know the standard European Spanish word. Example - most books teach rubio for someone blond. Mexican Spanish, at least that in the North of Mexico, uses guero.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chavela382611

Thank you. Yes, I agree. We went to visit family in Tampico and I have a son who is blonde. Most used guero. Fortunately, I remember a lot of those things from my childhood. It is coming back slowly. We use orejas for ears, but duolingo seemed to use oidos. I had never heard that before. Threw me a bit.

6 months ago
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